Abstract Paintings by Corinne Natel.

Abstract Paintings by Corinne Natel.
An Interview with Corinne Natel.


Who and where are you from?

I’m Corinne Natel, an abstract artist from London, UK.

How you got into this?

I was creative from a young age and enjoyed painting. I came to a crossroads at degree level between choosing to study Fine Art or Media Production. I thought I should study Media Production. I went on to work as a web designer which was quite creative.

After a few years of working I knew something was missing. I started painting again and knew that was the missing piece! I then got the opportunity to leave my job and do some freelance web design work and this enabled me to have the freedom to paint more and develop my art career. Painting is my ultimate passion and I feel lost if I don’t paint for a while!

What is your driving force?

To create and be a successful artist! I am lucky to have the freedom to be able to create art. It’s a great feeling to be doing something that I love and also so rewarding when people connect to what I am doing. I love how painting makes me feel a sense of freedom, escapism and is the ultimate form of expression. I enjoy how I can go on a journey when painting, from a blank white canvas to creating something new. I feel complete making art and I know that I am supposed to be doing this, that it is my purpose (dharma).


What kind of work you do and why?

I specialise in abstract mixed media fluid paintings. Currently I am working with resin and inks. My main inspirations are nature, fashion, travel and media. I am always inspired by the seasons and time of year and this usually reflects in my work and also colour investigation. I aim to create vibrant and emotive works.

Tell us more about your thought process.

I use a lot of negative space in my works. When I was studying my art teacher introduced me to the works of Alberto Giacometti, who is one of my ultimate inspirations! I learnt so much from his pieces which focused on investigating space and how this worked in relation to his subjects. I'm always looking for the space in my work. It's creating the balance between matter and space that allows the painting to flow and breathe.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I love the works of  Karin Vermeer for the stunning technique and colours and also Julia Benz for beautiful use of colours.

Abstract Paintings by Cecilia Arrospide.

Abstract Paintings by Cecilia Arrospide.
Aire Primaveral - Oleo Sobre Lienzo - 37x51in
An Interview with Cecilia Arrospide.

Who and where are you from?

I am Cecilia Fernández de Arróspide, peruvian, I live in Lima, Perú, nearby the ocean.

How you got into this?

My mother was also a fine artist, so from my early childhood I have been in contact with art, museums, books, and so on.  I started drawing and painting with pastels, much like impressionists, especially Degas.

What is your driving force?

My main inspiration in nature and its colors, my driving force, I would say like Rilke, is a need to express myself, to enjoy colors, it is a passion for me.  I have learned to respect my creative process where sometimes I do not feel inspired to paint and I just draw or do some collage until I feel ready to begin again.

What kind of work you do and why?

Mainly I do abstract painting where color is the main subject, sometimes I use very bright colors and then I need to use more quiet colors.   Inspired in flowers, skies or the ocean, my paintings have an aereal athmosphere.  The  series I am working on now is called "Reflections"   Mostly dyptics where one has architectural references and the other flower references, joined by the same color scheme.   I also work on collage, which I enjoy very much the fact that I find special relations between the elements forming a more surreal composition.  Same as in drawings.  When I draw i let the ideas go out without any purpose or control, then I decide which could be a painting.

Tell us more about your thought process.

My thought process happens while working,  I start each work  without any intention, in fact sometimes I start several works at the same time, choosing the colors I want to use in each ocassion.   At a set point I  decide, or the picture decides, how to continue, where to add an element or withdraw another element.  At that point the work has a way.
Thus I paint several works and later on I decide the name, the series to which it belongs, the concept that is behind.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

One artist I follow is Rhony Alhalel.   I personally know Rhony and have followed his career,  he is really authentic in his work, and masters his techniches.   He works with oil, Japanese ink, sculping stones,  and draws.

Abstract and Transitional Paintings by Jane Efroni.

Abstract and Transitional Paintings by Jane Efroni.
An Interview with Jane Efroni.

Who and where are you from?

Hello, my name is Jane Efroni. I was born and raised in Kent UK. After leaving school I took a year off from studies to work and travel with the intention of returning to university. That never happened! The year of travelling turned into ten and I finally settled down in Israel. Today I live on a kibbutz in the North of the country, the Western Galilee region on the Mediterranean coast.

How you got into this?

As a child I grew up in a pretty artistic home though I wasn't aware of it at the time. My father is a musician and photographer and worked as the art director of a greetings card company. My mother was a teacher and is an avid interior decorator and crafter. I don't remember painting much at home when I was young but I was always drawing. I had a great art teacher at school and went to a Saturday morning art club. 

The interest in art and the desire to create was always within me. When I had my own children my creative spirit was rekindled. I spent many hours with them and their friends painting and creating at the kitchen table.Too soon they grew up and found other interests and the art supplies were put away as life got in the way.


What is your driving force?

About four years ago I had a severe depressive episode. It was not the first I had experienced but this time it made me realise that medication was not going to be enough. I needed to reconnect with my spirit and give expression to my soul. 

I rediscovered myself through art and found solace in painting. It kept me sane! My studio became my retreat, my private escape from the world where I can switch off my unquiet mind and submerge myself in the joy and freedom of painting. It was the process rather than the finished work that drove me and continues to this day to be my driving force.

What kind of work you do and why?

I generally paint in acrylics on canvas sometimes using various mediums and plaster. Occasionally I will use water colours and collage techniques.

I love to paint large but have recently started experimenting on small paper works; it feels very different and I'm enjoying the challenge. My works are abstract and transitional, influenced by the horizon line; sometimes resembling a seascape or landscape, other times more graphic and urban inspired. 

I rarely use a brush, preferring spatulas, palette knives and squeegees. I love the viscosity of paint, the feeling of it spreading over the canvas beneath my fingers....I find it quite sensual. There is a fine line (no pun intended) between control and release.....this perfectly reflects my personality; at once a control freak and at the same time having the desire but not always the ability, to just let go!  In painting I find a connectedness I often feel alludes me in other areas of my life.

Please tell us more about your thought process.

I try not to overthink when I'm working. 
I don't plan a painting before I start, though I may decide beforehand what colours I want to use often depending on my mood, sometimes just on what is available. I often start by writing some thoughts or words on the canvas and continue the process by applying and subtracting layers of paint allowing the painting to guide me. I like to scratch back into the surface, creating scars and texture. I paint simply to create, working from a place of instinct and intuition. There are no hidden meanings in my artworks; I don't like to over intellectualize art......I find it unnecessary and elitist. 

What people see in my paintings is up to them. There are no hidden meanings here. I do however, hope that my art connects with the viewer, inspiring within them some feeling, emotion or memory. Art does not have to be profound or make a statement. Ultimately it has to be something you can live with and be happy with looking at everyday.

I sell my paintings internationally and am a member of several online gallery shops, however the commission is expensive, therefore I opened my own online shop where the prices are affordable for anyone interested in collecting original art to decorate their walls. I am represented and exhibited in galleries in Tel Aviv. 

Abstract Expressionist Paintings by Magdalena Morey.

Abstract Expressionist Paintings by Magdalena Morey.
From The Distance
An Interview with Magdalena Morey.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Magdalena Morey and I'm a professional abstract expressionist artist, originally from Poland but now living in Spain. I grew up in Lublin, Poland and have always loved being surrounded by nature.


How you got into this?

I've loved creating things since I was a small child and would spend my early summers experimenting with mud, sticks and stones. By the time I was a young teenager I understood that Art was an essential part of who I am and studied Textiles at art college for 5 years before moving onto studying Painting at university for another 5 years whilst also working full time at a commercial art studio in order to pay my fees. In 2005 I moved to Cambridge, England and began developing my own style and technique; it was surprisingly hard to do before then when I was working full time painting for someone else! In 2009 I moved countries again and went to live in Switzerland. The dominant art scene there was more abstract than I had been used to and I began to incorporate aspects of it into my work. After my husband's contract in Switzerland came to an end, in 2015 we moved to Spain, since when I have been concentrating on my art career full time.

What is your driving force?

I've always felt a powerful connection to the natural world and the drive to express it by whatever means has only grown stronger with age. I absolutely love travelling and experiencing places slightly off the beaten track and much of my landscape work comes from the desire to express the beauty of specific moments spent surrounded by amazing scenery. I also do figurative work which provides me with an outlet through which I can examine my own states of being. 


What kind of work you do and why?

These days my work can be broadly categorized as mixed media abstract expressionist landscapes and figurative. Most of my work from the past year or so also includes gold or copper leaf to a greater or lesser extent, which I have found to be a huge help in trying to capture a sense of the incredible heat and quality of the light here in central Spain. I never paint traditional self-portraits, but the women in my figurative pieces are all a part of me in some way and provide me with a necessary internal counterbalance to my very much external landscapes.


Tell us more about your thought process.

When I begin a landscape painting I usually have either a photo of a spot I've visited or an image in my mind of a particular quality of light that I'd like to capture. I work in acrylics, watercolors, pastels, pencils and gold leaf and there's a lot of room for experimentation so I will regularly notice a detail in the painting that I'm working that contains a particularly interesting effect and will start a fresh canvas to explore that effect. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. An interesting challenge is when I get asked to either scale up or down a previous painting. Techniques that work at one size often don't look good at a different scale so I'll need to invent a new technique to achieve the same overall effect.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Magdalena Abakanowicz (1930 – 2017) was a Polish artist/sculptor and fibre artist, known for using textiles as a sculptural medium. One of her most recognizable works is a 3 dimensional fiber work called Abakans and also her figurative and non-figurative series called Humanoids. I have found her work inspiring ever since I was in art college studying textiles as she was merging textile art with sculpture. 

Paintings by Nina Hansen from Denmark.

Paintings by Nina Hansen from Denmark.
Go for it 50x50 cm.
An Interview with Nina Hansen.

Who and from where are you?

My name is Nina Hansen. I was born in Bergen, Norway. Now living in Denmark.

How you got into this?

I have always been fascinated by art and design. I have been drawing since I was a child. At that time I drew mostly animals, like dogs and horses. Later I have started to paint with acrylic on canvas.

What is your driving force?

Being creative has always been a driving force in my life. Painting is my soul, and gives me great joy and relaxation. It lends me the opportunity to express myself and release an otherwise uncontrollable energy, which bring my back to the studio almost every day. I love to find new ways to express myself, and the idea to focus on details in a new way is very rewarding

What kind of work you do and why?

I paint mostly whit acrylic and paint marker. My paintings are abstract and contemporary with strong vibrant colors. I am experimenting with shape, colors and different techniques. My tools are usually painting knife, spatula and fingers. It is impossible for me to predict the final outcome. It is evolving gradually in the making.

The vivid colors are meant to induce happiness and vitality to the viewer.

I am working with intuition and expressionism. The process is investigative, and the randomness of
sudden evolving shapes and strokes, are creating a multitude of paths. 

My final goal is to take the viewer on a trip in to their own imagination……. and out of the ordinary.

Abstract Expressionistic Paintings by Angel Reyes.

Abstract Expressionistic Paintings by Angel Reyes.
An Interview with Angel Reyes.


Who and where are you from?

My name is Angel Reyes, I was born and raised in Puerto Rico where I'm currently living.

How you got into this?

Since I can remember, I've been fascinated with drawing and sketching. At a very young age I started drawing everything that caught my eye every time I had an opportunity, and I've always been charmed by the fact that you can mimic anything you see with just a pencil and/or some pigments on a blank sheet of paper or canvas, or any other surface for that matter. But I wasn't serious about it until I saw an instructional video from a famous artist on YouTube in 2013. I was just mesmerized by the way he created this amazing works of art just with the pallet knife and some oil paints. At that moment I decided I wanted to do that for a living. 

What is your driving force?

I'm driven by the colorful essence and beauty of everything in the process of life. 

What kind of work you do?

As time passed I have developed my own painting style through experimentation and constant learning and practice. So most of my work could be considered as abstract expressionism and neo figurative. 


Why you do it?

I like to bend and break rules. There's no boundaries to what can be create as an abstract expressionistic artist.

What media and technique do you use?

I prefer acrylic paint but I also use digital software. Mainly I use pallet knife or mixed technique.

Abstract Paintings by Dominik Mareš from Prague.

Abstract Paintings by Dominik Mareš from Prague.
Zimy na zemi_2013_120X150.
An Interview with Dominik Mareš.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Dominik Mareš. I'm contemporary czech painter and designer from Prague, Czech Republic.

How you got into this? 

I was born in Ostrava in 1972. At the age of seventeen, during studies at the grammar school, I began painting. The first big exhibition at the Art House in Opava in 1992 was a success and opened new opportunities. I graduated from the Faculty of Economics, but then moved to Prague, where I presented myself in an exhibition at the Galerie U Řečických.

To a wider awareness, I enrolled in a separate exhibition at the National Technical Museum in 1997, which included more than 90 works of art. For the present I presented my paintings in the spirit of structural abstraction on four dozen separate exhibitions in Bohemia and abroad. My works are part of private collections in more than twenty countries.

A major tribute to me was the demand for american movie "Wanted" to rent three scenes for scenes interiors featuring actress Angelina Jolie and actor Morgan Freeman.


What is your driving force?

It's everything I see around. Nature, people, city. I love life and currently recording into my pictures Pragovka Art District where I have atelier and it's really inspiring place to me. 

What kind of work you do and why?

I'm abstract painter. My works are in the spirit of structural abstraction. It's my way of expressing the world's vision.

Abstract Art by Alexis James from Indiana.

Abstract Art by Alexis James from Indiana.
An Interview with Alexis James.

Who and where are you from?

I am Alexis James. My mother had me at 16 and my father was 18. My father passed away at 23 from pancreatitis as a result of excessive alcohol use.

How you got into this?

I am from Indiana. My family comes from a long line of French heritage on both sides and many suffer from alcoholism. I was not excerpt from alcohol abuse. In fact, a couple years ago it almost killed me. I had always loved art but through the early stages of sobriety it was my saving grace. I took all of my obsessive energy and put it into my painting. I began realizing how free I felt as a result. To be focused on not the world, but to be in my head alone with me in a physical trance.

What is your driving force?

My driving force is nothing more than freedom. I never go into a piece with any predetermined outcome. In fact, my paints are in a big bucket that I just reach my hands into while creating and use what the universe gives me. I don't want my work to be constrained by worldly ideas or images so I leave both out of my works. This allows them to be closer to the spirit realm that lies beyond ourselves.

What kind of work you do and why?

In my pieces I use primarily oils with the occasional plaster. While channeling the spirit world I wanted to allow a more organic and 3D image to appear. Allowing for the images to come through more whole and clear. Texture gives another voice to the truth I am channeling from a deep intuitive area in the mind and heart.

In summary my work is about freedom from the world we know, the pain that can be felt, even freedom from the happiness that we can feel as a result of our human condition. It's a way to shut down from what we know and open up to a world that we do not know. I allow the connections of what we are surrounded by to dissipate and I slip into wonderland. Where I allow the white rabbit and the catipillar to speak through me. I am unattached and free.

Abstract Expressionism by David Stegmann.

Abstract Expressionism by David Stegmann.
An Interview with David Stegmann.

Who and from where are you?

My Name is David Stegmann, I'm living and working in Staufen (South Germany). This area is culturally interesting as it is close to the French and Swiss boarder and various influences have created a buzzing new scene here.

How you got into this?

My father was a sculptor, he educated me in drawing, modelling and sculpting but my personal interest was and still is to paint. I started as early as 13 with street art and got subsequently recognized by galleries and other artists. I had my first street art exhibition when I was 24. After various exhibitions my expression changed from classic street art towards more contemporary, abstract painting. Since then I have been focusing on identifying my own abstract style. Currently I am trying to transform abstract landscapes into more focused work of a specific detail I find important. This transformation has been very rewarding for me as it gives me a new look upon my way of expression. 

What is your driving force?

The driving force behind my work is the urge to get my thoughts on canvas. I always loved to paint and by now it´s an uncontrollable energy which brings me back to the studio every day. Finding new ways to express myself and the idea to focus on details and creating them in a new way is very fulfilling. To get closer to creating something close to the perfection of nature is an ultimate goal. 


What kind of work you do and why?

I would call my work modern, abstract expressionism. In my head most pictures are already set and day by day I get closer to the image in my head until I can call it finished. It's a journey which takes sometimes weeks to get there.
I paint a lot with oil and acrylic lacquer or just acrylic paint on canvas, wood or paper. I really love to work very pastose as it ads a specific soul to my paintings and I love the extra dimension. 

Abstract Fluid Art by Seraph-Eden Carr from Canada.

Abstract Fluid Art by Seraph-Eden Carr from Canada.
She Dove In.
An Interview with Seraph-Eden Carr.

Who and from where are you from?

My name is Seraph-Eden Carr. I am a Metis performer, painter, and artisan from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

How you got into this?

I come from a very artistic family and although I have a heavy background in dance and performance, for as long as I can remember I found painting, crafting, and visual arts in general, to be very moving and liberating for me. 

After my first baby was born I found myself focused on student politics and activism, radio, and traditional dance while taking an interdisciplinary Native Studies degree where I had particular fascinations with history and material culture(s). I wasn’t giving much thought to my visual art except for class projects and when I was asked to help choose an interior design aesthetic for a public building. However, over the course of 8 years, through a series of unfortunate events, other career opportunities I took, and a diagnosis of anxiety and depression I realized that painting is something that I found true joy in.  I loved participating in yet another aspect of our social culture that makes me feel even more connected to others throughout history, past and future. And it made me and my artist/poet Grandma extremely happy. All of my artistic pursuits, painting, making, refinishing furniture, dancing, singing, comes from deep within my soul. So, I took the things near and dear to me and started painting and making with compulsion. From Contemporary Indigenous art, to Metis florals and geometrics on décor and furniture, the natural world, to pottery, “protest art”, and the fluid art featured here, I cannot get enough. There are definitely not enough hours in the day, braincells for me to learn everything I want to, or money to throw at it. But I definitely try. 

What is your driving force?

A few things drive me. Self expression, storytelling, creating things that I find meaningful or culturally relevant, or things that I find joyous to create are what compels me to do and continue doing. I do it to stay connected to my Grandmother. She’d be so thrilled at how far I’ve come and how many pieces I’ve produced in the past two years of her absence. I’m driven by the new life I’ve had to forge since struggling with a mood disorder and post traumatic stress and how helpful I find visual art to be. Painting has replaced journaling. 

What kind of work you do and why?

I’ll answer that question in relation to the selection shown here which is Abstract Fluid Art and it has been done in various ways. Some are a handful of pouring techniques that are completely abstract or they are manipulated to make abstract expressionist forms. A couple of others are resin based, others still are technically “fluid” but are not “poured”. They are applied by palette knife and other tools. All of them are mixed media using a variety of paints and mediums. Some of them are full of texture and depth that can only translate honestly in person. The selected paintings shown are from throughout my study period working out how to best illicit the visuals I want for a planned series. 

I started fluid painting because at the time I was feeling like I needed to work through a gap in my inspiration. I spent hours creating what I found to be very visually stimulating art and being one who loves a challenge, set to figuring out how to tell stories with it.

Whether completely abstract or done with some intent, all of these have a mind of their own. They are almost a metaphorical struggle for me between complete unbridled freedom but also needing to stay fixed or within the boundaries enough in order to end up with a composition that is not overwhelming while still being wild at heart.

I currently paint full time and split my time between my trade and my home-based studio where I do my Contemporary and fluid paintings for personal collections, and my artisanal goods. I take every opportunity to be mentored by established artists and tradespeople and am a member of a printmaking studio in my hometown.

Abstract Paintings by Juro Kralovic from Canada.

Abstract Paintings by Juro Kralovic from Canada. Contemporary Art
Sector
An Interview with Juro Kralovic.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Juro Kralovic, born in the former Czechoslovakia in 1983, currently living and working out of Edmonton, Alberta (Canada).


How did you get into this?

I started drawing at an early age, and later it became a tool of rebellion in a dogmatic post-communistic school system. Coming from a liberal and creative upbringing, I chose to study at The School of Applied Arts in Bratislava (Stone sculpture department). My mother is a successful abstract painter and interior designer, so growing up in the environment shaped my perception of aesthetics and creative process. 

After studies, I joined armed forces for mandatory service which along with my passion for martial arts, gave me much needed self discipline, a tool that I use in everyday life and painting/art. After the army, I started working at a wood shop where I acquired new skills working with wood and building furniture. In the years of establishing a new life, family, and small contracting business in a new Country, most of my creativity was pushed aside. In recent years I started unleashing the urge to create with smaller projects like furniture, wood art, and experimenting with wood stains.

Everything I've learned an experienced in my life translates into the work I do now.

What is the driving force?

I would say is the sensation of freedom, its a momentary escape from this structured, controlled, and overwhelming world and society. It's my protest against fake smiles, political correctness, and small mindedness. On the other hand, its a medium to connect with like minded people and expand my horizons, it also brings me joy when my art leaves a positive impact. My interest in everything controversial, mystical, and abandoned transfers to my work. Maybe its the ego or rebellious personality that likes to challenge the old world taboos and status quo. 

What kind of work do you do an why?

Mostly abstract, occasionally portrait. Sculpture and abstract expressionism and street art art my main sources of inspiration, everything else is observing environment, nature and accidental man made beauty. I love working with contrast and bold colors. My tool box is very limited, simplicity keeps it fun while I'm still open to experimenting. My goal is to make paintings bigger than life which I think is impossible, so this is why I won't stop trying.

Abstract Expressionist Paintings of Flowers by Brian Wayne Jansen from Washington.

Abstract Expressionist Paintings of Flowers by Brian Wayne Jansen from Washington.
An Interview with Brian Wayne Jansen.

Who and where from are you?

My name is Brian Wayne Jansen, I am 36. I grew up on a farm in the state of Nebraska. I am currently residing in Olympia, WA, but I am thinking of moving to Los Angeles, CA soon.

How you got into this?

I took an art history course in high school, I was very inspired by pop art Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstien, Keith Harring as well as Picasso, Van Gogh,Frida Kahlo and Georgia O Keefe: they gave me the sense that anyone could make art, the history of art was more inspiring than the actual art classes I received in school, so I bought a set of brushes and canvas, went to my home and began doing my own thing.

What is your driving force?

I am a very creative person, in that if I am not involved in something artistically my whole life suffers. I work in other collaborative arts as well, theater, film, ect. With painting I don’t need a group of people to pick up a brush and go down the worm hole, and I need to go down the worm hole to report back on what I see and experience with in human behavior.

What kind of work do you do and why?

I love people, I love to look at them and lately I’ve been working on two different styles, I do these abstract expressionist paintings of flowers: the flowers are people to me, bright, beautiful, stretched to the heavens, yet tethered to the earth, given to shine therein. The other style are these chiaroscuro-veined portraits, with those I am trying to capture both the light and darkness to report an essence of the human entities trapped in between, both literally and spiritually speaking.

Abstract Paintings by Ella Marciello form Turin, Italy.

Abstract Paintings by Ella Marciello form Turin, Italy.
An Interview with Ella Marciello.

Who and from where are you?

I live and work in Turin, Italy, for the moment and I don't really like labels. I am a copywriter, a curious person, an artist and a mother.

How you got into this and What is your driving force?

I was born during a fall  night, in 1980. I completed my advanced scientific studies and when I was ready to choose for myself, I enrolled at the University of Liberal Arts in Turin. I find a balance between my love of art and writing combining the two with the concept of space: the boundaries of a page or a canvas. To overcome those limits, during my artistic career I  have explored different techniques and have eventually found my own artistic dimension halfway between informalism, abstract expressionism and matter painting. What isn’t (or not yet) expressible by words acquires the intrinsic connotation of art as seen in my eyes: deprived of any formal sense it encompasses every meaning in the artistic gesture, in the creative act itself. I draw inspiration from multiple and various influences: from the relationship between emotions and shades of colour to considering the body as a space and an instrument of art, from self-examination to the abstract visions of memories or human interactions. During the years I took part in several solo and group exhibitions and  I have been joining AUT (Artisti Uniti Torinesi) an artistic association which gathers painters and illustrators since 2013. Mygoal is to reveal the hidden beauty of the unconscious. 

What kind of work you do and why? 

I’ve always felt the need to communicate. I have never been  concerned about how I could manage to do it but I knew I had to. Art is a need, an  intrinsic necessity. I mostly do mixed media abstract works because I think there are so varied and wide worlds that form just becomes a limit.

I’m not interested in form. I’m interested in content, in matter, in emotions. My works are based on the emotions I feel while I paint, on memories, on human connections and interactions.
What I am, what I feel  during my creative process is the real artistic act.   What we see on the canvas is a simulacrum, it’s the shell of something  that has got lost and  that leaves this trace as evidence. It is not describable  by words and  expressible in no other ways but this one. What I try to do is to touch, to move something inside the viewer, without giving precise directions, through contrasts, colours and different media:  my purpose is to make that moment of introspection  come to light, the moment in which the public is intimately connected with my works of art.

Most of my paintings reflect general human states: they are linked to self- examination and  catharsis, to  the acknowledgement of the human condition and to the awareness of the process of time.

"I’ve always felt the need to communicate. I have never been  concerned about how I could manage to do it but I knew I had to. Art is a need, an  intrinsic necessity. I mostly do mixed media abstract works because I think there are so varied and wide worlds that form just becomes a limit. Abstract art is my idea of bearing reality."

life Uninterrupted by G.H. Rabbath from Italy.

life Uninterrupted by G.H. Rabbath from Italy.

Bio

G.H. Rabbath Ph.D. uses writing and visual art as a performative and participative art action. He taught Cognitive Science and Art Theory in a Beirut University, and his Ph.D. Thesis was referenced in philosopher Jean Clam's Orexis. G.H. Rabbath engaged in several meta-artistic interventions in the art world since 2009 and the publication of 'Can One Man Save the (Art) World'. In 2010 he curated M. Obaidi’s latest show in Art Dubai along side publishing 'Mr Obaidi and the Fair Skies® Corporation' that addressed the neuroscience of racial bias in relation to conceptual art. In 2013 he launched The Better World Project, and on November 28, 2014, was part of the official festivities for the observance of the United Nations' International Year of Justice for the Palestinian People, at U.N. HQ in Beirut where he showed The Better World Project portraits of Palestinians as well as U.N. staff. As of October 2015 year, a special edition of edition of the Better World Project called Signing with Light can be seen in the recently published book The Gulf at OR books on behalf of the GulfLabor.org artist coalition fighting for the rights of migrant labor in the U.A.E. and Gulf countries. In 2016, he launched The Better World Project in Europe. Life Uninterrupted is his latest project using action painting to connect in real time with the viewer, and create a narrative together.

Concept

A large sheet of uninterrupted paper is unrolled in a space. The artist stand near it. People come up to the artist and tell him or give him something of theirs, and their actions and words are acted as semiotraces on the paper. People can choose to interact with the fresh paint of the semiotraces or leave them be. They can choose to interact with the artist, or the other people present or just keep their distance. Words are only spoken to the artist when when near the paper. New paper is unrolled in parallel spaces as more people choose to interact with the artist, until there is no space left.

This is life uninterrupted.

Abstracts by Joseph Grahame from UK.

Abstracts by Joseph Grahame from UK.
An Interview with Joseph Grahame.

Who and from where are you?

My name is Joseph Grahame and I'm an artist from Leeds, UK. My practice is primarily involved with painting and its processes. 

How you got into this?

I began studying art in college and completed an extended diploma in art and design before moving to London to study for a year at Goldsmiths, University of London. After completing that year I moved back to Leeds to study a BA Fine Art at the University of Leeds. I became interested in painters such as Cy Twombly, Gerhard Richter, Callum Innes and Brice Marden among many others. I suppose from there on, my own practice became engaged with abstraction through processes and techniques. What I am most interested in however, is what it means to make paintings now. 

What is your driving force?

I don't know if I have one in particular, but it can range from a lot of different things. Sometimes it can be an idea of how to apply something, or another time it could be something very simple like the desire to use a type of material or paint. It all stems from an interest in experimentation though.

What kind of work you do and why?

I currently make a lot of paintings on canvas and have been doing so for the past few years. I'm very interested in experimenting with different processes in regard to the application of paint, and also how abstraction can occur through using various techniques.

Calm a series of Abstract Paintings by Karin Cutler from Sydney.

Calm a series of Abstract Paintings by Karin Cutler from Sydney.
Looking Back
An Interview with Karin Cutler.

Who and from where are you?

I’m Karin Cutler, a mixed media painter living in Sydney with my husband and two children. I was born in Sweden and spent my early childhood in Stockholm.

How you got into this?

Responding to a strong desire to live a more creative life, I started painting full-time and selling my paintings a few years ago, allowing art to come to the forefront instead of lurking in the sidelines. I have always enjoyed various creative pursuits and eventually found my way to painting, which is now my greatest creative passion.

What is your driving force?

I simply have to paint. It allows me to channel my emotions, express myself, and add meaning. Almost everything around me, be it nature, travels or my everyday life inspires me. I particularly love imperfections, organic shapes, and rough textures: anything from weathered rock formations, bark, the ocean on rainy days, to cracked plaster and peeling paint on old walls. My art passion is consuming, when I’m not painting I’m either reading something art related, looking at art, or thinking about how to work something I’m looking at into my art. It provides me with a wonderful sense of purpose…..and a long to-do list that doesn’t get done!

What kind of work you do and why? 

I love to use mixed media in my painting with varying levels of abstraction. I describe my process as sensory, spontaneous, emotionally guided interactions with the canvas - I paint what I feel rather than what I see. I love to turn up at the canvas with an intention rather than a plan, an emotion, a desire to explore, focusing on the elements of movement, texture and light. I intuitively respond to marks I make, adding layers, covering over, then etching and scratching back to reveal something beneath. I love the viewer to discover new details over time.

Tell Us about your Series "Calm".

‘Calm’ is a continuing series that I paint in response to a need to create peace and tranquility in our frenetic lives. Initially, the marks may be energetic and emotional, then further layers act to create simplicity and calm. Occasionally a hint of a realistic element tries to appear and I may allow that to happen.I hope the viewer will feel a sense of calm and intrigue when looking at this series.

Abstract Paintings by Max Benz from Germany.

Abstract Paintings by Max Benz from Germany.
An Interview with Max Benz.

Who and from where are you?

Max Benz, born 1968 in Cologne/Germany.


How you got into this?

As a child I was drawing quite a lot, but I wanted to become a doctor. Later, shortly before the career as a plastic surgeon was starting to lift off with a study of medicine, I decided to go for arts instead. My dad hated me.  ;)

A good while before that, besides high school, I started an education as a sculptor. My teacher was the sculptor and potter Jo Karl in Cologne, Germany. Later, after a short visit at the arts faculty (philosophy course) in Cologne, I was accepted as a student at the highly renowned Kunstakademie Düsseldorf (academy of fine arts in Düsseldorf/Germany). After a while I decided to change from sculpture to painting and was accepted by Markus Lüpertz as his student. Finally I was awarded by him as his "Meisterschüler" (master class student). Since leaving the academy in 1998 I live and work as a professional painter and sculptor in Cologne/Germany.

Abstract Paintings by Edith Lüthi from Switzerland.

Abstract Paintings by Edith Lüthi from Switzerland.
Up from the Deep
An Interview with Edith Lüthi.


Who and from where are you?

Mein Name ist Edith Lüthi.Geboren März 1957 Ich lebe in der Schweiz.

How you got into this?

Ich begann mit ca. 30 Jahren zu malen.ca. 4 Jahre besuchte ich einen Malkurs nach Martenod. In mir wuchs die Sehnsucht meinen eigenen Ausdruck zu finden so ging ich auf die Suche. Besuchte div. andere Kurse um neue Techniken kennen zu lernen. Musik und Tanz war lange meine Begleitung während des Malprozesses. Auf meiner Suche nach meiner Bildsprache fand ich den Weg zu Trancetrommeln, Trancetanz. Bei Cambra Skadé fand ich dann einen tieferen Zugang zu meiner Seele. Ich absolvierte eine 3 jährige Ausbildung zu Maltherapeutin - nur für mich - ohne das Ziel als
Maltherapeutin arbeiten zu wollen. Auch dies ein sehr tiefer, nicht immer einfacher Lernprozess zu mir selbst. So fand ich über viele Jahre mehr und mehr zu meiner Bildsprache.

Abstract Paintings by Shellie Garber from USA.

Abstract Paintings by Shellie Garber from USA.
Hold On Tight - Mixed media on paper
From the Brush of Artist - Hello, my name is Shellie Garber and I am from Portland Oregon, USA.

I began abstract painting about a year and a half ago. My mother is an artist and teacher and I grew up in an artistic family. My parents were always very creative. I sort of went the other direction with my career and became a registered nurse. I love the sciences including math and chemistry. I wanted a career with a dependable paycheck because I had seen my parents who are self-employed struggle at times to make ends meet. I always thought that I was mostly left brain inclined. However, one day, about a year and a half ago, I was visiting my mothers studio while she was painting. I told her I thought it looked like fun. She basically challenged me to create an abstract painting just to see what I would come up with, so I did. I absolutely fell in love with the process and I actually really liked my first painting too!  From that moment forward I was hooked. I went out and bought some paints, paper, and a couple of small canvases and began to paint. I am completely self-taught. My mother has offered several painting tips, but she has always encouraged me to find my own way. I mostly have learned to paint through daily practice, exploring, experimenting and playing. I watch online painting videos and I view lots and lots of images of abstract art. I have several favorite abstract artists that continue to inspire me. Cy Twombly and Margaret Mitchell are among my favorites.

I utilize several mediums in my paintings, including acrylic, oil, pencil, oul pastel, collage and spray paint. I paint pretty much every day, and have since I began. If I don't get to paint on a particular day I feel anxious. Painting allows me to work out my emotions, to bring forth and release the tension and stress of the day. It is very cathartic and relaxing for me. I dream about painting while I sleep and think about it throughout the day. You could say I am somewhat obsessed!!

I particularly enjoy abstract painting because there are no limits. Abstraction is a language of shapes, colors, textures and marks that I find beautiful and mysterious. I very much love communicating with the world in this unique way. I have recently begun to show in local art galleries in Portland Oregon. I have had three gallery exhibitions so far.