Dark Art by Kim Jakobsson from Sweden.

Dark Art by Kim Jakobsson from Sweden
Function
An Interview with Kim Jakobsson.

Who and where are you from?

I'm an artist from a small town called Örebro, located in the middle of Sweden. You have never heard of it. Probably.

What brought you to Art?

I've always been painting, but only quite recently I decided to take it to the next level. I'm very active on Instagram where I try to promote my art as much as possible. The need to express myself has always been a big part of my life, whether it's through writing or painting. At this point in my life it's all about painting though.

What is your driving force?

To constantly develop my skillset. I feel like I learn new things every day about painting. And I also have a dream to be able to do this on full time, like every artist out there I suppose. It's a weird time for contemporary artists, there are so many of us – and only a handful will be able to do it full time. Hopefully I can be one of them soon. I'm trying my best to make that happen, but it's tough.

What kind of work you do and why?

I pretty much only paint human subjects. There have been times where I've tried to paint different things, but I always end up coming back to humans. There is something endlessly fascinating about the body and the face. I guess my work could be described as surreal and dark. I try to delve deep into the human psyche and extract our deepest fears and anxiety.

Tell us more about your thought process.

I as many probably feel like it's damn near impossible to be original in this climate. Everything has been done a million times already, and I struggle alot with trying to come up with new ideas. I spend many hours a day painting, but end up throwing alot of stuff away – since it lacks originality.

My process usually consists of me painting a pretty normal portrait. Let it sink in for a day or two, and then I deform it and try to make the painting look weird. I do what with many different techniques – but my end goal is always to make it as weird as possible. But at the same time the painting needs to retain some sort of realism. I do believe that art today need some sort of realism in order to convey an emotion. Totally abstract stuff is of zero interest to me.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Oh wow, there are so many. I would have to say Ken Currie, an oil painter from Scotland. He's a huge inspiration to me. He has a really interesting way of portraying people in a weird and creepy way. His painting "Gallowgate Lass" is one of the most haunting images I've seen. 

This guy toally deserves more recognition. A true master when it comes to dark art.

Dark Art by Wojciech Sosidko.

An Interview with Wojciech Sosidko.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Wojciech Sosidko. I’m from Poland. I was born in Kołobrzeg – a tourist town at the seaside in the North of Poland. Now, I live and work in Poznań.

What brought you to Art?

I do art because of Władysław Hasior.

What is your driving force?

Hate.

What kind of work you do and why?

It depends- it's a process, it's organic.

Tell us more about your thought process.

In the beginning there is a concept, inseparable from the material with which I intend to create it. The work that I begin to reminisce to a certain point of careful craftsmanship: I go into the studio, pull the canvas, ground it, prepare the material. I think it is extremely important to prepare everything yourself as much as possible to influence what is going to happen in the very act of creation.

When I have a solid effect of my work, it is never the final form. I see the possibility of change, redefine, change, and shape what is going on until I feel that I am no longer able to give more of myself to the work. My work is a long and multi-stage process, often full of rebounding, rebellion and destruction of what has already been established.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Dark Surrealism Paintings by Paul Yunin.

Dark Surrealism Paintings by Paul Yunin.
Soulmates 87x61cm (34x24in) Oil, hardboard.
An Interview with Paul Yunin.

Who and where are you from? 

Paul Yunin, a painter from Russia, working in St. Petersburg. 

What brought you to Art? 

By education I am an engineer. I was brought to art by the love for the muse about 5-6 years ago. But I was completely immersed in painting only in 2016. The creative half won engineering in me. I originally started working in interior painting, painted on demand, but then realized that I was closer to being an artist rather than a craftsman. 

What is your driving force? 

I have a desire to talk to the audience, I have something to say. Also, I have a need for experiment and a search for new ways of expressing an idea. Starting my work, I do not know what I will end up with. I direct the brush that gives birth to images on the canvas which my subconscious suggests to me. The inspiration for the plots is my relationships with people, nature, maybe even with God and also with other forms of art.

I prefer Renaissance artists: Leonardo Da Vinci, Sandro Botticelli, etc. When painting my work, I mostly use the scumble technique of painting. It unites me with Renaissance artists, with symbolism and some mysticism of their artworks. It is worth noting such kings of dark art as Zidzislav Beckinsky and Hans Rudy Giger. If we talk about cinema, the works of Trier, Kubrick, Tarkovsky and other directors, similar in spirit are close to me.

What kind of work you do and why? 

I paint in the genre of dark surrealism. But I'm not trying to stay within the frames of the genre. Rather, on the contrary, I am trying to avoid stamps that have developed in different kinds of dark styles of world art. I don’t have a goal to depict a horror story, cause anxiety in the viewer.

Tell us more about your thought process. 

At the beginning of my work, I'm tuning in to the wave of maximum openness of soul and sincerity. I trying to paint my surreal artworks truly, as Friedrich Nietzsche had said "writing with own blood". My task is to convey the light and darkness of my own experiences, feelings, thoughts as accurately as possible with the help of non-verbal images, and if I may say so - of the archetypes. I don’t write extramundane worlds. I paint what is here and now, trying to pack the prose of reality into a bright poetic form. Behind the gloomy atmosphere of my works there are hidden the revelations of the subconscious, deep, perhaps vulnerable sensuality, religious mysticism and even lyricism. Behind thorn spikes, suffering of heroes and unearthly matters there is spiritual nakedness, liberation from the burdensome conventions of the surrounding world and striving for truth, at all cost, whether it is pleasant or cruel.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Alexander Kostetsky (Russ. Александр Владимирович Костецкий, Ukr.Олександр Володимирович Костецький;, November 14, 1954 in Kiev – January 4, 2010 in Kiev) was a Ukrainian painter and sculptor. His name has various transliterations into English and variants include Aleksandr Kostetsky, Alexander Kostecky, Alexander Kostetski and Aleksandr Kosteckij. His artist stile is Magic Realism.

Expressionist Figurative Paintings by David Deweerdt.

Expressionist Figurative Paintings by David Deweerdt.
An Interview with David Deweerdt.

Who and where are you from?

I am a Belgian painter born in Brussels. I chose for a figurative approach of the human body. I’m feeling close to an artistic painting movement called ‘figuration critique’.

How you got into this?

Naturally. I would even say instinctively. Representing body and mind is simply part of me.


What is your driving force?

The strength of my work is situated in the treatment of the materials that compose the inner side of the bodies I’m representing. My paintings represent psychologic pain.

What kind of work you do and why?

My work is clearly expressionist. It shows through the bodies, the psychologic torments of our minds. I have worked since a long time with people with a mental disease and I want our society to have another regard on those mentally disturbed beings.

Tell us more about your thought process.

I start working on living models. My work is first technical based on preliminar drawings. Later on, I choose materials and colours. I’m always attentive to details and precision.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Georg Wachberg.

fACES by Robin Norman from Sweden.

fACES by Robin Norman from Sweden.
An Interview with Robin Norman.

Who are you and where are you from?

My name is Robin Norman and im an artist from a small town called Åmål in Sweden. I have moved around a bit, but live and work here for now.

How you got in to this?

I have always been intrested in creating and making art in different forms. I have been drawing and painting since forever. In the latest years I have started making music. I think I started making stuff early because it felt good and I got some kind of reward inside my brain. 

What is your driving force?

I MUST make something every day, otherwise i dont feel well. I have an urge to take my thoughts and place them outside my head in different forms. So I can understand it better. 
I am what i make. I suffer from mental illness and it helps to make art. 

What kind of work do you do and why? 

Im in love with grafit. That is my to-go-to material. Just a pencil and a paper. But I try to work with everything i can get my hands on. My favorite subject is the human. Mostly the head. I try to variate me, but in a perfect world i would just sit and draw different faces all day.

Dark Art Paintings by Steve Otis from Canada.

Dark Art Paintings by Steve Otis from Canada.
Feeder.
An Interview with Steve Otis.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Steve Otis, I am an imaginative Realist Dark artist from the Great White North (Canada that is) more specifically form Quebec City.

How you got into this?

I have been drawings since a very early age. Fueled by images of DC and Marvel comics. I soon discovered the great Warren magazines (Creepy and Eerie in the early 70's). From there I began to delve more deeply into horror, gothic and sci fi type art. Heavily influenced by Frazetta, Boris and Richard Corben, I began experimenting in oil paints in 1988. My first desire was to become a fantasy illustrator and did quite a bit of work in that style in the late 90’s for CCG (collectible card games). By the early 2000's, I gave up on oil painting as it was way to time consuming and started using exclusively acrylics.  I began to look for techniques to challenge my artistic style in a more fine art vein while keeping a firm thematic of dark art. I had grown tired of the generic sword and sorcery genre. I began working with more textures, abstract approaches and have been working in this vein ever since.

What is your driving force?

Intensity, emotional tension, human form, light versus dark. These are always the main themes in all of my works. I love to contrast colors and compositions to go from abstract to realist often in the same piece. Since I work for my own vision I can have all the freedom I need to experiment and challenge myself constantly! I hate using the same technique too long.  I have a need to re invent myself constantly and to discover new images and realms in my more dark and fine art production.


What kind of work you do and why?

My work tends to fall in the imaginative realism and dark art world. I like to push my boundaries and produce work that is high in symbolism and that permits people to dive into the painting and to create their own interpretation. If it offends you, makes you wonder, makes you happy, sad or anything else then I feel I have achieved my artistic goal. The world of dark art permits such excursions, there are no limits. Why not try to make the ugly attractive? Why not break out of the conventional composition of standard art? In the end, I produce work that I feel will reach out and grab the viewers and lead them into a new world full of awe, wonder and sometimes fear.

Dark Surrealism Paintings by Vladislav Cadaversky from Ukraine.

Dark Surrealism Paintings by Vladislav Cadaversky from Ukraine. Contemporary Art
An Interview with Vladislav Cadaversky.


Who and from where are you?

My name is Vladislav Cadaversky. Born in 7.7.88. I'm a visual artist and musician from Kyiv, Ukraine.

How you got into this?

Well, to be honest, the art was a part of me since very childhood. Every soul that come to this world has a strong potential and sence of creativity. I captured and absorbed the mystery of things what were unknown to me. There were alot of fears, you know. As some psychological aspects of every child and the space arround. Darkness, mythology and ancient civilizations, creatures from dreams (or even nightmares), as strong magnet, became a whole passion... But aging through a life, some period of time took all of my energy. And for a whole decade there left no place for art... Just silence and reality.

Art is a kind of innate drive that seizes a human being and makes him its instrument. To perform this difficult 'work' it is sometimes necessary for him to sacrifice happiness and everything that makes life worth living for the ordinary human being.

Since 2014 I came back to this. But with a decision to reload everything. As a perception change the understanding and point of view, I became an intuitive painter. This was some kind of new experience. I finally found how to be myself again.
Artworks were forming from pure abstractions of color and feelings, cosmic visions.
But the more I processed the more I progressed. From pure abstraction came a form. A structures, and a creatures. Tortured by the unconscious visions and memories, every subsequent painting became more detailed. Builded by the layers of textures and colors, to finalise the whole monolith.

What is your driving force?

I always paint with a music. Mostly ambient or dark ambient soundscapes (sometimes other choises of taste). The process of painting in such way became a real meditation. The refflections of passions - myth, fantasy, ancient civilizations and post-apocalypse deserts. The weight of souls in the sand. Connection between inner and outer worlds. My favorie surreal artist is Zdislaw Bekskinski. Who's paintings are the biggest inspiration for me too. My idea is to extend visions but not to copy. Because paintings are always intuitive it makes them even stronger. It is a discovery of unconscious.

What kind of work you do and why?

I do dark, macabre, surreal paintings. Based on different but mixed techniques , experiments with textures , colors and forms. Oils, acrylics and rarely watercolors. Dark paintings are a part of 'shadow' behind the inner soul, an unconscious aspect of personality. I made a couple of comission works for music bands and there are alot of ideas to come.
I also have two ambient music projects which refflects different visual periods.

Paintings by Linda Helene Syvertsen from Horten, Norway.

Paintings by Linda Helene Syvertsen from Horten, Norway.
An small Interview with Linda Helene Syvertsen.

Who and from where are you?

My name is Linda Helene Syvertsen. I live in Horten,Norway.

How you got into this?

I started to paint about three years ago. I needed a hobby, and it quickly became a passion in my life, one that I had been searching for a long time. Today I have a studio at Artilleriverkstedet in my hometown where I work towards my first solo exhibition this summer. 

What is your driving force? 

The driving force for me is to express myself and the urge to explore different techniques. I think this urge has helped me to be expressive in my painting actually.I never plan exactly how to paint a portrait when I start, but I always end up with a portrait that expresses my mood at the time. Very often my portraits give me a new insight. I'm not finished before the painting is somehow beautiful for me. I then step back, and suddenly I can see an expression that's mirroring my mood at the time. My portraits then give me a higher self-knowledge.

What kind of work you do and why?

I paint intuitive portraits and some abstracts/half abstracts on canvas. I use acrylics because I don't have the patience to wait for the painting to dry before I can paint the next layer. I use different tools beside brushes when I paint, like knife, spatula, both rubber and steel, a sponge, my fingernails and sometimes stencils to make dots. I never finish the painting before I feel that peace and a flow in both color and shape. I'm hoping that others who see my pictures are able to recognize some of those expressions and feelings within themselves as well.