Art by Roberta Pizzorno.

Art by Roberta Pizzorno.
An Interview with Roberta Pizzorno.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Roberta Pizzorno, my roots are italian. 

My mother’s family is originally from Florence, the art nest of the world. 

I grew up in this eternal city. I studied languages in Switzerland and in reality I feel very much a citizen of the world. I lived in the Canary Islands, in Cairo, and then I moved in central Africa in Kenya, on the Indian Ocean.

What brought you to Art?

I remember the beautiful time spent with my granfather walking around Galleria degli Uffizi, in Florence one of the most important museum in the world and my grandfather’s favorite place. I was just a child and art entered in my world from the main entrance but at the age of 8 a terrible accident happened and my grandfather died, a part of me was froze and I did never draw again.

Around 35 years old,  after work and family, I decided to take care of the part of me that for some reason had been injured and damaged since childhood. I felt a strong need to draw but at the same time a terrifying fear was paralyzing me and did not let me pick up a pencil without having tachycardia.

What is your driving force?

I really wanted to transform that strong emotion of fear into a creative and constructive energy as the alchemical transmutation of lead into gold.

As I turned 20 years of classical and contemporary dance into yoga and daily meditation, I try to trasmute the fear into space of consciousness.

What kind of work you do and why?

In my artwork I tell stories that are not tied to states of being, they are not self-referential, they contain profound messages that become original for each of us. They are advisors for use. Nutrient instruction booklets for a broader, wider and a brighter view of who we really are. The drawings tell it to me and I translate it for all those who have time and space to look and see.

A sort of communication of symbolic, abstract or evocative images.

They can be extended and amplified visions of mankind, of human frailty and resources. They can be suggestions for new opportunities or better behaviors. The themes are very varied but they spiral around a single Fulcrum: The mystery of life.

I like using black ink to cover white spaces but I also love watercolors so sensitive and snappish.

Tell us more about your thought process.

My next exhibition is at Museo Arti Visive Palazzo Collicola in Spoleto Umbria Italy. Opening during the Festival of Two Worlds 30th June 2018, is titled “Full of Emptiness”.  It’s a state of mind or better a state of mindfullness that comes after many years of daily exercise. Not much to say, not much to think but just being fully present in the moment. Hic et nunc. Empty space of silence sound. The blank paper in front of me, no judgement, no expectations. I draw a little seed that start to be alive like a fertilized egg, winning more and more power from every breath I take. 

Sometimes it happens to witness epiphany fulminating events that redraw the meaning of a path. These are extraordinary moments in which even if I am the author, I become a spectator and for a while I disappear, leaving room for revelation.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

One artist? Only one? 
Chromaticism, composition, aesthetics, balance, creativity, technique, inspiration, harmony, intention, beauty … there are so many artists that embody these energies!

If I could only save one artist from the end of the world? Than it has to be Nicola de Maria: His skies, stars and flowers, love and colors… Impossible survive without them.

Hollow Children a Series by Bjorn Griesbach.

Hollow Children a Series by Bjorn Griesbach from Germany.
An Interview with Bjorn Griesbach.

Who and where are you from?

Hi, my name is Björn. I am a visual artist from Germany.

What brought you to Art?

For me, art has always been a means of self-soothing and a great way to communicate my thoughts.

What is your driving force?

The lifelong exploration of myself and my surroundings.

What kind of work you do and why?

Sometimes I work on contextual illustrations, sometimes I work on personal, more abstract projects.

Tell us more about your thought process.

Depending on the project I'm working on, I usually like to find a balance between visual expression and contextual clarity.

Tell us about the Hollow Children Series.

The "Hollow Children" were part of my Master of Arts thesis exhibition, in which I explored a new generation in a dystopian world where career building comes before character building.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why? 

I can't limit myself to one favourite artist, as I follow and admire artists from all kinds of branches - fine art, illustration, animation etc..

15 Beautiful Birds Illustrations by Daniel Merac.

15 Beautiful Birds Illustrations by Daniel Merac.
Great Egret
An Interview with Daniel Merac.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Daniel Merac, I’m a visual artist and an industrial designer from Colombia, who loves traditional illustration, nature, indie rock music, comics, guitars, daydreaming and birding.

How you got into this?

Back in 2015 while I was about to graduate as an Industrial designer, I decided to take a drawing challenge called Inktober, which is now very popular among the traditional art community and consists on making an ink drawing for every day of October. Little did I know that entering this challenge was the first step that would take me on the journey of finding this wonderful passion of creating art. The experience with Inktober awakened my desire of creating hand-drawn visual pieces, which had been hibernating for long. I think it was put to sleep during university, right after my days of school when I couldn’t help but draw on my notebooks during the uninteresting classes, which were actually quite a bunch, so I had plenty of time to practice my doodles back then.

This feeling for creating and drawing grew on me exponentially during that drawing challenge, so that when it was over I felt that I needed more of that, and through practice, I slowly found the determination to follow that unexpected artistic path. It shocks me to think that if I hadn't tried Inktober that year, who knows how many time would've passed before I figured out about this passion. That’s why I always recommend this challenge to every artist or an aspiring one, whether they’re willing to get into art or they’re already experienced creators, it teaches consistency, resolution, and it lets you focus on your own voice as an artist.


What is your driving force?

Rock music and nature are the elements that make my nest, meaning my home or as a friend would say, my bonfire, that thing that lights up your being and keeps you warm while you’re in the middle of the dark.  They give me calm, shelter, inspiration, and along with art, they allow me to express in a much more comfortable and fluent way. My recent connection with nature is slowly transforming my vision of life and also my plans and dreams. One of those dreams that motivates me to create more, is to be able to give back to nature and help to restore and protect the environment and its wonderful but endangered fauna.


What kind of work you do and why?

My work revolves around the creatures that inhabit nature, they are often the leading characters in my illustrations. I draw them because the process is greatly enjoyable and also I do it to put them in the spotlight so people can have the chance to know these species exist, and later on develop more empathy towards them, possibly taking action when it comes to protecting them and their environment.

I work in traditional and digital mediums, but for my illustrations, I really prefer to work with my hands. A pencil and a fine liner are just enough. On the other hand, for making animations of my drawings I do have to rely on my computer. I also enjoy drawing stories, places, and people, although since I got into birding around June of this year, I haven’t stopped drawing birds. These winged creatures really captivated me, and therefore my recent work is full of them. I just can’t help it. Also, I happen to live in Cali, the city with the highest amount of bird species in Colombia. 561 in total. So I guess that explains a bit my love for birds.

Tell us more about your thought process.

The symbolism and meanings of species of fauna and flora across the different cultures captivate me just as the forms, textures, colors, and sounds of each creature. When I’m planning a new illustration or a series I like to look into those elements and combine them in a piece that may resonate with someone. Through this, I just aim to help a little bit to strengthen the link that people have with nature.

When it comes to my visual style, I think indie rock and post-rock have had a huge influence on it. The loudness and sounds of this music are present in the textures of my illustrations, the messy lines, the noise of the pointillism, and the high contrast. Just as these genres do, my artwork is in constant change, I try to keep in mind that there’re always new things to explore, learn and improve. This constant variation of style and subjects is key to me because it helps me to keep the process interesting and exciting.


Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I love the art of illustrator and concept artist J.A.W. Cooper, I admire the bond she has with nature and the way she translates it into her artwork is truly amazing. I definitely recommend checking out her illustrations.

Black cartoons by Zeinab Niche.

Thought Provoking Black cartoons by Zeinab Niche from Tehran, Iran
An Interview with Zeinab Niche.

Who and where are you from?

My name's Zeinab Niche, born on May 13, 1984 in Tehran, Iran. Graduated in Graphic Arts and Master of Animation.

What brought you to Art?

First of all, my passion and desire made me strive for the arts, but after completing my academic career, I became more serious in art, and it was also due to problems that occurred in my community.

What is your driving force?

I am convinced by my driving force for painting and caricature or so-called designs ... Sometimes my concern is sometimes my concern and sometimes the events of the day or the actions that have been done in the past and its impact is already in our lives.

What kind of work you do and why?

Well, after a real painting period, I was drawn to the cartoon, and I liked this space more and impressed me ... and the reason why I was working out a black cartoon:

I live in a limited, censorship country, a country that looks different and different. A tremendous rich and wealthy nation, and disadvantaged people, class differences, lies and the absence of a nation and state And these are the hidden pains among my people. I really liked to paint flowers and nature rather than drawing black and white images, but living conditions are not normal here.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Yes
A talented artist called saeed baba'ee
Which unfortunately is not raised.

Drawings by Nicholas Odhiambo from Kenya.

Drawings by Nicholas Odhiambo from Kenya.
An Interview with Nicholas Odhiambo.

Who and where are you from?

Hi, I am Nicholas Odhiambo aka Nikomambo an artist from Kisumu, kenya. earned a diploma in arts and design from Mwangaza art school in 2014. I started out as a painter before venturing into graphite  drawing.

What is drawing for you and tell us more about your thought process?

Drawing is for me a way to tell a story and evoke a feeling. I use graphite as a tool to create imagery that is both real and surreal laced in ideology. In a attempt to create allegory I combine my ideas and observance of daily human activities and behavioural changes, reactions on war and conflicts. I put all this experiences into a new context, the story continues to grow as I explore more and more of my consciousness and subconscious.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I admire the works of Laurie Limpton an American graphite artist who's works are based on social political issues among other local and international great artists who inspire my work in one way or the other.

Graphite & Charcoal Drawings by Laurie Lipton.

Graphite & Charcoal Drawings by Laurie Lipton.
"ROUND & ROUND 2012", 37"x53", charcoal & pencil on paper.
An Interview with Laurie Lipton.

Who and where are you from?

I am Laurie Lipton and I was born in NYC, but spent more than half my adult life in Europe. I currently live in Los Angeles.

How you got into this?

I didn't. This got into me. I drew before I could talk. I've been drawing longer than anyone on earth. I don't necessarily think that's a good thing... it's slightly mad.


What is your driving force?

Bliss. Drawing is my bliss.

What kind of work you do and why? 

I draw with graphite & charcoal. Sometimes my drawings are 9foot x 12foot, but the technique is very detailed & tedious. I build up forms using thousands of tiny cross-hatched lines, like an early Renaissance egg-tempera painting but much more complex & difficult. You can't really tell HOW detailed my work is on a computer screen, but people are stunned into silence at my shows. Unlike most "Modern Art", there's so much to  take in.


Tell us more about your thought process.

If I could tell you, in words, about my thought process, I'd be a writer.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Zdzisław Beksiński... because his imagery is unique, powerful, disturbing and brilliantly executed. He died in 2005, but you can find his work easily online. 

fACES by Robin Norman from Sweden.

fACES by Robin Norman from Sweden.
An Interview with Robin Norman.

Who are you and where are you from?

My name is Robin Norman and im an artist from a small town called Åmål in Sweden. I have moved around a bit, but live and work here for now.

How you got in to this?

I have always been intrested in creating and making art in different forms. I have been drawing and painting since forever. In the latest years I have started making music. I think I started making stuff early because it felt good and I got some kind of reward inside my brain. 

What is your driving force?

I MUST make something every day, otherwise i dont feel well. I have an urge to take my thoughts and place them outside my head in different forms. So I can understand it better. 
I am what i make. I suffer from mental illness and it helps to make art. 

What kind of work do you do and why? 

Im in love with grafit. That is my to-go-to material. Just a pencil and a paper. But I try to work with everything i can get my hands on. My favorite subject is the human. Mostly the head. I try to variate me, but in a perfect world i would just sit and draw different faces all day.

Art by Óscar Sanmartín Vargas from Spain.

Art by Óscar Sanmartín Vargas from Spain.
An Interview with Óscar Sanmartín Vargas.

Who and where are you from?

I am 45 years old and I was born in Zaragoza a medium city in the northeast of Spain between Madrid and Barcelona.

How you got into this?

Painting and drawing since childhood. After studying high school I went to an Academy of Fine Arts and started painting oil. After a few years of dedicating myself exclusively to art I began to do film and television works and for a time I participated in television series and some feature film. Later I started working in the publishing world and began to make covers for books and illustrated albums, an activity that I am currently working on together with the design of album covers.

What is your driving force?

I think that drawing and art in general is a game that connects us with the mysterious. It is a way to get in touch with a part of us that normally remains hidden but is able to surface when you work. Those are the two components that move my way of working, the game and the mysterious.

What kind of work you do and why?

I spent a lot of time drawing and painting oil but over the years it seemed monotonous and predictable and solitary, so I began to explore other areas such as cinema or illustration. I also found it interesting to jump to the volume building dioramas and miniature sets. At the moment I am dedicated to the illustration of books and the design of covers of music albums.

Drawings by Mani from France.

Drawings by Mani from France.
An Interview with Mani.

Who and where are you from ?

Hi ! I'm Mani. I work and live in Lyon, France, I do drawings and other imagery things like that. First I was a cinema addict, I had no realy artistic education, but very soon I developped a visual mind, and a personnal affinity with langage of pictures. So I began Cinema studies.


How you got into this ?

I draw with my simple ballpoint pen since almost ten years !

I first drawn during university classes. While I was listening teachers, I let my ballpoint pen slide on the side of my sheets... And when I had to choose what will I do after university, I just look back at my papers and discoverd thousands of drawings forming a single universe... So I decided to experiment this drawing way rather than continue studies... wonder where it would leading me... Now I develop all this cosmogony through drawings, animation, and stencil street arts since almost ten years...


What is your driving force ?

Honestly I let my hand lead me. Not trying to think about a concept nore a shape...
As I am a slow worker, I have all the time to find a continuity and equilibrium into the draw. I shape my whole artworks with all the forms I have memorise in the world outside. It's like a piling up of all stuff I saw during my life, organized into a metaphoric configuration that's opening towards an interpretation of how the world works.


What kind of work you do and why ?

I just draw, because I can't do something else ! Also because it's the more natural thing, the most efficious and relaxing stuff I need to be a stable personne :) I try to put in my artworks my whole point of view on our humanity. That's why there is humor, sadness, sorrow, questioning, surprises, some kind of greatness and emptyness in the same time... and so and so in it. I want people who are taking time to look at my work understand that they are actually looking at themselves !

Compound Portrait Series by Josh Bowe.

Compound Portrait Series by Josh Bowe.
Connective Tissue, Compound Portrait Series, Sketched with a parallel pen, Ink on Paper.
An Interview with Josh Bowe.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Josh Bowe. I'm from the UK, I am 44 years old, and have been a permanent resident of the UK since birth. Currently I lived in a small village in Mid Wales called  Llansantffraid, which I use mainly as studio primarily, and a home secondly.

How you got into this

I got into art at a very young age I guess, probably well before i can remember, my parents said I was obsessed with drawing before I could speak. Painting and drawing have always played a primary role in my life, I don't think I've ever spent more than a week away from participating in either practice. As an adult I have always had the goal to become a full time artist, where my income was solely sourced from my artistic endeavours, the last three/four years i have been able to attain this goal.

What is your driving force?

I doubt I have one driving force in such a subjective cultural linchpin, but...... if I were to describe one over riding tenant that has stayed with me from my teenage years, that would be the notion that art actual requires no innate talent from its producer, the more you put into your practice, the quicker you improve. I recently read a quote from the actor Alan Alda about art and another cultural linchpin subject science - "Art requires rigour, and science requires creativity", for me this quote summarises wonderfully the true notion of what being an artist is. If you're not passionate about working at it, it's probably not for you.

What kind of work you do and why?

Currently my work is almost entirely focused on the human figure, and most significantly the portrait. I recently had a bit of an epiphany moment in my portrait studies, after being asked what my portraits are about. the best description I could muster is that I was more interested in finding character within my portraits, as opposed to the quite common notion of finding identity within portraits. For me faces designate more than someones identity, be it the artist, or the sitter. Faces communicate emotions quite competently, and these emotions are well comprehended by other humans, so I guess it could be argued that there are identifying aspects to faces that identify more than the persona of the artist or sitter. This line of enquiry has led my into doing some research on the subject of Physiognomy, which is the supposed art of judging character from facial characteristics. Although this is a subject matter with quite a long history, it has been rebuked quite heavily in recent history scientifically, but has had something of a revival through the research of Louis Corman, a French psychiatrist, whose research led him to believe that there were three core emotions well conveyed by humans through facial expression Warmth, Power, and Honesty.

Tell us more about Compound Portrait Series? 

The compound portrait series is a very recent series I made using parallel pens to draw out and then using various wash techniques over the top once the sketch had been established in pen. I keep line studies of all of my sketches, as this is generally the most time consuming aspect to sketching for me, and for years now I've been over laying line sketches over the top of each other. I'd like to say there is a grand over arching narrative to the reasoning behind why I do this, but in reality there are more playful to me then something I can get precious about a singualr notion behind them. I'm very interested in cross sectioning portraits that would otherwise not have any relationship. quite often the results are jarring, but I find this adds to the line of inquiry more often than not. My plan now is to somehow manifest these sketches as larger scale oil paintings.

Fiction of the Self by Mikele from Venezuela.

Fiction of the Self by Mikele from Venezuela.
An Interview with Mikele.

Who and where are you from?

My artistic name is Mikele, I'm a 42 years old, visual artist that currently lives and work in the city of Maracaibo, located in Venezuela.

How you got into this? 

Since I was a child I always were in touch with art, because my father is also a visual artist. This allowed me to comprehend the environment and context of artists at an early age. It also allowed me to get in touch with materials and experiment with them at the time. After that, still being too young, I had the oportunity to study Graphic design, Illustration and Comic some time later. It was at that point that I got to deepen into the language of drawing, studying how to draw the human figure, Learn how to work with different materials and expand a little bit more my knowledge in that area. Parallel to that,  I had the oportunity of venturing as a graphic designer and audiovisual editor for Television. I have to confess that this incursion into the Audiovisual world led me to step away from drawing a few years. It allowed me to inquire into another languages, my work at that moment was more of a gestural nature, a lot more experimental and so I worked that way for years, trying to figure out myself between experiments, Always feeling like I HAD to go back and retake drawing, until I did and approximately 5 years ago I retook it and so we have these artworks as a result of it.

What is your driving force?

I always wanted to work graphite pencil and charcoal drawing on fabric, which is not an usual thing to do, it was a technical restlessness that I had since I was very young. Due to the lack of materials that can be found in my country, It's not easy to find quality paper and large sizes, This has meant a true Technique crusade for me since drawing on fabric requires a very different usage of the canvas and it can come up with lots of disadvantages that you wouldn´t naturally have when using paper; These kinds of things lead you to develop your own technique and that´s a positive aspect of it. On the other hand I always wanted to have Technical control of the artwork. Previously I mentioned that at a certain point of my life my artwork became strictly experimental and working in an experimental way is really fun there are so many things left random. You don´t have absolute control of results and that, for me implied lost of problems and disjunctives, that´s why a few years ago I went back to drawing, which is the language that I feel more comfortable and that comfort allows me to have control of the artwork. My driving force is having rescued drawing for me, which makes me really happy and also feel fulfilled. It´s to recreate my own language and my own technique without any avant-garde pretensions.


What kind of work you do and why?

Currently I work with graphite pencil and charcoal, using other media like Oxide an acrylic paint as a complement. In most cases working on fabric. I work many themes related to each other, my drawings show  a very simple narrative in which I suggest to see others as I see myself, which is an observation and tolerance exercise that I call "Fiction of the self". It´s a way to understand the human being without their environment, their context. It´s that fictitious self that we see in others. I regularly show different characters immersed in different planes and atmospheres, experiencing deep states of introspection, understanding the empty space, the solitude and silence as another composition element.

Abstract Expressionism by Felix Dolah from Germany.

Abstract Expressionism by Felix Dolah from Germany.
An Interview with Felix Dolah.

Who and from where are you?

My name is Felix Dolah and I am from Mainz, Germany.

How you got into this?

A basic interest in all kinds of art (Literature, Film, Philosophy and so on) made me write about art in a very personal way for more than two years. When I felt things clearing up, I just started to experiment with different materials to see how it feels. At the end I came up with charcoal and water. Those two elements felt damn right and they matched up perfectly to my own unique style of expressing my inner world with all its light and darkness.

What is your driving force?

My driving force might be the hope that what I do is able to help someone. And if it is just one single person that really feels attached to what I do, isn't that enough? I made my experiences and i felt my pain. I want to talk about that. I want to sensitize people to listen to their own pain because every painfull situation in a persons life is a chance to grow and to overcome boarders.


What kind of work you do and why?

My therapist says I do a psychoanalysis in Paintings. I work with real life models. My attempt is to have an honest dialogue from human to human. I talk to my models about myself and I listen to their stories. Out of our conversations there emerges a concept to manifest their stories inside of one of my works. I do that because I belive in the possibility that human beings can overcome distances between one another by having goodhearted diologues about themselves and this one big fascinating game we call "life".

1+1=1

Drawings by Liza Elizabeth LaBarge from New York.

Drawings by Liza Elizabeth LaBarge from New York.
Adam & Eve Evolution Charcoal and Soft Pastel on Paper 60x60in 2012.
An Interview with Liza Elizabeth LaBarge.

Who and where are you from?

I was born in Potsdam NY in 1990 and have remained an upstate NY resident since. I received a Bachelor of Fine Arts with a minor in Pre-Creative Arts Therapy from SUNY Potsdam in 2012 and completed an MFA in Visual Studies from the University at Buffalo in 2014. I am currently teaching as an Adjunct Instructor at St. Lawrence University and SUNY Potsdam as I continue my professional career as an emerging artist. 

How you got into this?

My mother works in the Art Museum at SUNY Potsdam, which allowed for me to be exposed to art exhibitions and art practices from an early age. Art was a norm for me (SUNY Potsdam is known for being an Arts campus) and I think I took the opportunity to be surrounded by artistic individuals for granted until I realized I myself wanted a career that allowed for creative exploration. The professors in undergrad allowed for ample material exploration opportunities, yet encouraged an educational environment tailored to mastering your chosen material. I was drawn to charcoal as a Fine art form. I became amazed at how the materials worked together to form a recognizable image. I began to view charcoal and the drawing process itself as less of a material solely for sketching. I related the drawing process to sculpture and “building” the formed/figures. I wanted to push the drawing process into a fine art form in itself.

What is your driving force?

My driving force is my urge to make things. I have a passion for a do it yourself life style. I want to know how things work and I want to be able to create the image I have in my head. Once I thought my work was technically sound, I began to be driven more by the message of the work. I wanted to bring images to life that made the viewer think about historical and/or contemporary human conditions.

What kind of work you do and why?

I explore contemporary topics related to womanhood through the process of reductive drawing techniques and additive soft pastel applications. The work is greatly influenced by psychoanalysis and the study of film theory. I strive to create intense theatrical depictions that attract the human eye, while simultaneously incorporating delightfully disturbing undertones. The work offers a glimpse into ambiguous narratives of femininity. I intend for the image to conjure thought/emotion while leaving ambiguity for further contemplation from the viewer. The audience is left to ponder the context in which the characters exist.

My most recent series is constructed as a therapeutic art form. Through the drawing process, I visually explore crocheted lace as a means of stitching together feminine themes. The detailed weaving and threading acts as a visual representation for the idea that we as humans are all shaped by various environmental influences, traditions, and past histories linking together to form one life. Therefore, the work becomes a representation of the life cycle. Images referencing life and death are acknowledged within a single framework; the image of mummification (death) is present while simultaneously referencing the image of the sonogram (birth).

Drawings by Tricia Butski from Buffalo, New York.

Drawings by Tricia Butski from Buffalo, New York.
Fission
An Interview with Tricia Butski.

Who and from where are you?

My name is Tricia Butski. I’m an artist living and working in Buffalo, NY.

How you got into this?

This series of work, titled‘Semblance’, stemsfrom a long period of trial, error, and experimentation. I worked through many tentative processes attempting to consolidate my thoughts on memory, preservation, and forgetting into a visual form. The biggest challenge I faced was expressing a subject that is in constant flux using a fixed medium. Though the imagery is static, I found that the drawings work together as a group, creating a cinematic effect through a sequence of progressive distortions in which the viewer’s gaze shifts from large scale to small, between the figure and the fragment.

What is your driving force?

My driving force is ultimately a distinct compulsion to create and to make a living through my creative process.

What kind of work you do and why?

I primarily work with drawing, using charcoal as my medium and the human figure as my subject. My work involves representations of the figure that lie in between hyperrealism and abstraction. The medium of charcoal serves as a material analog for impermanence, fragility, and malleability. I’ve found that it best articulates my thoughts about memory, not only for technical and aesthetic reasons, but also because of its origin. The medium consists of dead organic matter that is condensed, preserved, and then reanimated through drawing, speaking to the human recollection process.

Artist Statement

Through drawings rendered in charcoal, ‘Semblance’ examines issues related to memory by exploring its limitations and aestheticizing the instability inherent in portraiture. The work allows the viewer to enter the subconscious space between remembering and forgetting. The figures and faces, which have been distorted through a repetitive layering process, manipulate our sense of familiarity. The original image becomes fragmented through this process, a conceptual procedure that corresponds to the experience of forgetting the semblance of the face, the body, and the subject. Through distortion and fragmentation, the figures take on a monstrous form. The familiarity of the face evokes comfort while simultaneously rousing a sense of distress. This creates an intermediary form that inhabits a space both real and imagined. The resulting image is neither entirely original nor fully invented, taking form as a realistic rendering of a fleeting moment. By challenging the boundaries between representation and abstraction, and questioning the relationship between fluctuation and constancy, the works become entangled and disordered, mirroring the viewer’s innate desire for clarity and their proclivity for drawing meaning out of partiality.

Painted Drawings by Amaya Gurpide from Spain.

Painted Drawings by Amaya Gurpide from Spain.
An Interview with Amaya Gurpide.

Who and from where are you?

My name is Amaya Gurpide, I was born in the north of Spain. I've been immersed in the arts from a very young age as my father was a painter and I was raised seeing him draw from models, which had a huge impact on me as a child.  

How you got into this?

I received an art education in my hometown and eventually decided to move to New York to further my development and focus on learning figure drawing and painting from some of the most prominent artists of the time.

What is your driving force?

I'm completely captivated by nature, working from life is one the most fascinating experiences as an artist. I mainly work from models, usually people that I don't know but choose carefully based on the story I'd like to communicate through them. There is always something peculiar about them that triggers the story. I spend quite a long time, sometimes months, analyzing the sitter and knitting the necessary layers that will transcend the technical aspects of the work to achieve a solid, tangible reality.

What kind of work you do and why?

Though I love to paint, I've spent the last few years focusing on large mixed media drawings. When I draw I think as a painter and prepare my papers with the right tone and tooth according to the results I'd like to achieve. I mainly work with graphite, white and black chalk, gouache and charcoal, and use pencils and brushes to achieve a more painterly feeling. In the end, they are painted drawings.

Drawings by Yulia Lobanov from Barcelona, Spain.

Drawings by Yulia Lobanov from Barcelona, Spain.
An Interview with Yulia Lobanov.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Yulia Lobanov, I was born in Moscow, Russia and I'm 31. Several years ago I moved to Europe, initially to Italy and currently I'm based in Barcelona and I love it. I'm a yacht designer but drawing and painting more than just hobby for me..

How you got into this?

For the first time I asked my mum to let me go to the art school when I was 4 years old! So for me it was easy - I always knew I want to draw.   At age of 11 I went to art school and I was lucky to meet an amazing teacher from the "russian old school" so I was never get bored from the academic studies. There was only joy and passion for art. 

I'm endlessly thankful for my family for supporting me in that period, they never ever told me that it's useless. But there was one advice I took seriously - is to get a profession more practical and stable than artist. And I became architect and interior designer and never regret of that. However my drawing practice stoped for more than 10 years. When I moved to Barcelona I started to feel I need something else apart my job and fortunately I started to visit a life drawing studio. Later I resume my oil painting practice. And it gave me so much pleasure and I'm happy to draw and paint again! 


What is your driving force?

I love to draw. The process itself gives me incomparable feeling of freedom and concentration in the same time. It's the best meditation practice for me. So I'm driven by necessity, fulfilling my wellbeing.  

What kind of work you do and why?

If speak about object of my works is usually human body and portraits. I study how shadows can create shape, how shape can express character and emotions. It's a path from charcoal stain to storytelling. Through my studying while drawing I see how beautiful human being could be. No mater how close the model to the "beauty standard" is I see her uniqueness and beauty. I admire all my models!
However I usually don't call my works "art", it's rather drawing studies, technique exercises. I feel I need some time to find my art language and style. 

Figurative Drawings by Neal D Rolinson from UK.

Figurative Drawings by Neal D Rolinson from UK.
a moment in the making 
An Interview with Neal D Rolinson.

Who & from where are you?

Neal D Rolinson, living in Frome, Somerset, UK with my partner & two children.

How you got into this?

I've always drawn, from a young age my brother & I would draw with our father & I have fond & vivid memories from this period. Through my teenage years I attended college & university, venturing in various creative routes; life drawing, design, model making etc. After university reality kicked in. So for the fifteen years or so that followed I more or less stopped drawing & began observing life & began writing poetry. Then a few years ago I began drawing again, & it's like a switch has been thrown, it's has more purpose than ever to me.

What is your driving force?

Events & changes in your life trigger different reactions. Having children teaching them things awakens your own abilities & for me drawing is the one thing I've never doubted. This ultimately has inspired me to draw again, evoking memories of time spent drawing with my father.


What kind of work you do & why?

Figurative drawings that evoke emotions & movement. To create pieces that give you a powerful feeling back, to inspire others, & challenge artistic boundaries.

Tell us more about your drawings.


My drawings are about emotion, I layer lines to build characters. I chase movement, shape, mood & energy. I do not force my creativity by setting boundaries or restrictions, it has to be a flowing organic process. My pieces are captured moments & feelings, I rarely revisit or make alterations to them.

Sketches by Jahun Ku from South Korea.

Sketches by Jahun Ku from South Korea.
From the Brush of Artist - I live in South Korea and my name is Jahun Ku. I majored in design in college, but I have been in business for almost 20 years. My life has changed a lot since I posted a picture on Instagram in the beginning of last year while I was meaningless. I have a passion for painting that I had forgotten and I am happy every day. Thanks to the love and encouragement of many people, I am happy to draw pictures. Currently I am interested in tattoo and learning.

Illustrations by Nikolas Ilic from California.

Illustrations by Nikolas Ilic from California.
An Interview with Nikolas Ilic.

Who and from where are you?

My name is Nikolas Ilic and I am character designer/ visual development artist living in sunny Los Angeles, California. I am originally from the cold wintery Toronto,Canada where I did all my art studies and spent my whole childhood growing up.I grew up in a small town outside of Toronto and studied animation at Sheridan College, upon graduating in 2011 I worked in Toronto for about a year before moving out to Los Angeles for work and yes- I do miss the snow.  

How you got into this?

Since I was a kid I have always enjoyed art.It runs in my family as my dad is a fine artist, mainly doing oil paintings. He grew up in Serbia and then studied fine arts in France when he was younger before moving to Canada. So besides some of the genetic reasons I would also have to say my brother is a huge reason I got into art. When we were younger we would always draw together and make our own comic book ideas and covers. Coming up with worlds and characters that we found interesting.I also remember drawing from characters and art books all the time and trying to draw them as they appeared.Cartoons such as Looney Tunes, Tasmanian Devil, Ren & Stimpy etc and disney animated classics also played a huge role into me getting into art. I remember the first movie I seen in theaters was Beauty and the beast and was taken back by the fact that all these things I was seeing on the screen were hand drawn and personally crafted. 

As I grew up I stuck with art throughout high school and still enjoyed it very much.My high school was definitely not a “Art” high school so it was hard at times to stay motivated and to keep at it. After graduating is when I  had to ask myself. Is there a realistic career doing art and illustration? I then had a friend attending Sheridan College studying animation. I initially was interested in applying for the Illustration bachelor's program, however when my friend showed me the animation wing and kind of work they were doing I instantly knew. This was what I needed to be doing. So I then applied and got in the program the following year.

Charcoal Drawings by The Big Bad Gorilla from Toronto, Canada.

Charcoal Drawings by The Big Bad Gorilla from Toronto, Canada.
An Small Interview with The Big Bad Gorilla.

Who and from where are you?
My name is Riad, Aka, The Big Bad Gorilla. I live and love in Toronto. Always. 

How you got into this?
Born into it. My father was an artist. A skilled draftsman. I guess you can say it was always in my blood. My earliest memory was drawing large murals on my bedroom wall. 

What is your driving force?
Being alive. I'm grateful for my minuscule time on this planet and try my best to be a bit better than I was the night before. 

What kind of work you do and why?
Primarily charcoal and watercolor (plein air). Watercolour is unpredictable, unrelenting and uncompromising. It's a daily challenge and often a struggle. But it's one that I accept. Charcoal I adore because of the myriad ways to manipulate it.