Human Heads by Henrike Gomber from Germany.

Human Heads by Henrike Gomber from Germany.
An Interview with Henrike Gomber.

1) Who and where are you from?

My name is Henrike Gomber. I’m a German artist, based near Frankfurt.

2) What brought you to Art?

The work with ‚typical’ arts-materials like paper and colour accompanies me throughout my whole life. For many years I worked in product-design, as illustrator and colorator in different companies, professions where contact to colour and material is elementary. Painting in my leisure time has always been a relaxation and a hobby for me. But only when I went through a private and professional crisis I realized that painting means more to me then only a pastime, an amusement. It helped me to overcome problematic life-situations, it helped me to canalize and to free all the creativity and ideas that were stuck inside me.

3) What is your driving force?

Since I had that very realization I can hardly stop painting, it is like an addiction, but a healthy addiction. 
I am moved by an inner energy which I can barely describe. I start a painting without thinking about a concept. I sit in front of the empty paper and think of: Nothing! 
Then I take a brush or a spatula, dip it into some acrylic paint, without reflecting. And then it commences: Colour surfaces arise, they overlie themselves, they complement themselves. Then I take a pen or a wax crayon, draw contours. Figures arise, some of them dissolve, some complement themselves and add up to an image. And suddenly, before I know why, I feel that the picture is completed. And literally I awake from this inebriety and wonder why the painting looks the way it does. This inner monologue, or better this dialogue with myself, with my creativity, gives me strength and makes me happy. And if other people like the result: wonderful!

4) What kind of work you do and why?

I almost exclusively paint human heads. And I say heads with intent, because these aren’t portraits. They are abstracted, mask-like faces with human attributes. 
I usually work with acrylic paint and ink on paper. As a starting point I take one or more abstract colour surfaces and on these surfaces I draw contours and outlines. With the help of these lines the eye of the spectator gets foothold. Recognizable forms like eyes, ears or headgears arise. 
I like this interplay of abstraction and concretion, of the two-dimensional surface and depth. And I like that my faces express emotions. As a spectator, and I identify myself as a spectator, too, you can get in contact with the faces immediately and overcome the separation of reality and illustration. But I don’t want to dictate a certain interpretation of my work: The faces speak for themselves and every spectator receives his individual message.

5) Tell us more about your thought process.

As I tried to describe before, I don’t think about a concept before I start painting. I don’t do sketches beforehand and I don’t work with models. I rather give rein to my intuition and allow free play to my creativity within the frames set by the paper. For me it is fascinating that in spite of all the liberty of my rational thoughts, certain formal features appear regularly. Let me give you some examples: my heads often wear headgears as crowns, turbans or open forms. I mostly depict busts; the posture of the head is always precise, the posture of the body is only suggested by neck and shoulders. So my faces are not reduced to the section from chin to skullcap but are expanding to all sides. 
These formal expansions of my heads symbolize opening and protection at the same time. The fact that I repeat these formal features over and over again shows that behind my conscious, rational personality there seems to be another artist-individual inside me. And this artist-individual wants to discover the variety of human illustrations over and over again. And I appreciate that, since I like my faces and spend a lot of time with them in my studio. 

6) Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Unfortunately I can’t answer this question by mentioning one specific name of an artist. I avoid to entitle one certain artist to be my role model and to concentrate my admiration on this very person. No matter if it is an artist from arts history or a living colleague of mine. What interests me is the degree of authenticity an art work expresses. That includes not only visual arts, but also music, photography or other forms of artistic work. I am fascinated by artworks that build up an emotional connection to me which I can’t escape from. And I hope that this is exactly the effect my paintings have on others.

Figurative Painter Leticia Banegas from Honduras.

Figurative Painter Leticia Banegas from Honduras
An Interview with Leticia Banegas.

Who and where are you from?

I am Leticia Banegas, figurative painter and I was born and live in Honduras.

What brought you to Art?

I am making art since I can remember. When I was a child I would try to copy the faces in magazine covers, later in my teens I discovered painting. But art supplies were very expensive back then in Honduras. There was only one store and since there was no competition they pretty much sold art supplies for really high prices. In part that was a Good thing because that allowed me to experiment with non traditional materials and with school supplies. Later when I graduated high school I began studying graphic design in the University. It was the closest to art school in Honduras.

Even though I loved making art, for a long time I took it as a hobby (because I really didn't think I could make a living from art). After years jumping from one job to another I decided I couldn't keep taking Jobs I hated just to survive. So I took the plunge, it was so scary and exciting to quit my current job at the time and try to make a living by doing what I felt I was born to do. And it was the best decision.

What is your driving force?

I love what I do, so I guess that is my driving force in a way. I get up every morning happy to start work because I am doing what I love the most.

What kind of work you do and why?

I see my work as the portrayal of a world that exists somewhere between heaven and earth. When I paint I see these women, I see them walking like if underwater with their hair flowing in slow motion. They exist, I see them. It is a magical realm that most of us can´t see but that doesn´t mean it doesn´t exist. What inspires me is the women in my family through generations. Their stories are so rich, complex and some of them are almost surreal. I try to create a "world" populated by the magical presence of these women.

Tell us more about your thought process.
I don't really plan my paintings. Usually it all begins with an idea but the end result is completely different from where I started. When I draw these women I start building a story behind the character. It is somewhat hard to explain. When I am in the process of drawing I start to get to know the woman I am painting, her dreams, her life, her personality. So in a way it feels like the painting makes itself and I am just the channel that gets the

information out through a canvas.

Please share with us the modern artist whose work you find Interesting.

Patricia Ariel

Brad Kunkle

Igor and Marina

Portrait Paintings by Mario Henrique from Portugal.

Portrait Paintings by Mario Henrique from Portugal.
Somnium No. 9 Series III
An Interview with Mario Henrique.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Mario Henrique, i’m a painter based in Cascais, Portugal.

What brought you to Art?

I’ve always been curious and interested in art, even as child. I was fortunate enough to be able to travel quite a bit growing up, and living in Europe, it is relatively easy to move between different countries and experience distinct realities and cultures. My family always encouraged me to do so - I was exposed to museums, art galleries and exhibitions at a young age, and that was certainly a fundamental influence in my upbringing and visual culture.

What is your driving force?

Although I try not to rely to much on it - as it is more important to be self aware and mindful of your surroundings - one can draw inspiration from almost anything. A movie that I saw, a music that’s playing in the background, some old photos I revisit on my phone… the simplest things can trigger me into painting. Having said that, I’m more drawn to the human figure and facial expressions - that’s what I paint almost exclusively. But I can be driven or motivated to paint a face by being exposed to a completely different subject, like an abstract painting from another artist that may evoke an emotion that I relate to and then try to convey in my own work.

What kind of work you do and why?

I paint people. I find it to be the most interesting subject. I’m always intrigued by the subtleties and the double meanings of people’s body language, expressions, and looks… Whether I’m painting something more realistic, like the portrait collections, or something that leans more toward the abstract, like my “Ballerina Series,” I’m always fascinated by the unpredictability of the human behavior, the sudden movements, the brief glances, the impermanence of facial expressions.

Tell us more about your thought process.

I always paint with images and photos as reference. I donʼt like using live models, that gives me a sense of urgency and self-awareness. I prefer to use photographs, which I proceed to hang in my studio walls. I print the same image in colour, in black and white, with more or less contrast, more or less zoom. Then I select the colours that Iʼm going to use. Iʼm colour blind, so I have a short palette and paint directly out of the tubes and bottles, I donʼt tend to mix paints. I start by throwing paint at the canvas, without much thought. I have my photos as reference, but this process is inevitably random and chaotic. I use large spatulas to spread the paint on the canvas and when Iʼm happy with the result, I start to “dig out” the subject using dark and light colours to convey depth and emulate shadows or bright areas. Basically, where the paint falls on the canvas is where the figure will emerge, so my process is very much based on chance and spontaneity.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

William Stoher creates incredibly deep portrait paintings, I really enjoy the texture, complexity and intensity of the expressions and the scale of the pieces. We are both represented by the same gallery in Atlanta, GA (USA) - the Bill Lowe Gallery - although I have never met him in person.

Figurative Stories by Lupo Sol.

Figurative Stories by Lupo Sol.
The_kite_of_the_grandpa.
An Interview with Lupo Sol.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Pedro, although my friends call me Kepa. I use Lupo Sol as a stage name, so as you can see, there are already too many names! You can call me Lupo simply.

I was born in Euskadi, north of Spain, but I have lived in Alicante for five years.

What brought you to Art?

Although I always drew, I did comics and things like that, I did not start painting seriously until 2015. After being a web designer and developer in Madrid, I moved to Alicante to be with my girlfriend and, yes, to try to change course in my life.

One day, she, my wife, gave me a box of acrylic paints and I began little by little to resume my hobby, until I came to think of art as the liberator of my ruin, ha ha, but I am still in ruins and also crazy. So, I subsist as I can and I try to continue learning, you know.

I do not know if this answer will be romantic enough, but that's the way things are.

What is your driving force?

I imagine you are referring to my main motivation when it comes to painting ... I always liked to draw characters, faces, in everyday scenes of life, but I can not deny that painting for me is a therapy, an exorcism, that helps me to express my doubts, confusions and paradoxes, and if possible, to denounce the falsity of this absurd society.

That's what I would really like, to say what I think without metaphysics, without excessive symbology ... I do not try to climb to the clouds and tell you fantastic stories about "my art"; what you see is what you get.

Sometimes I try to make fun of the mass, of those empty beings that roam the streets, of all that is conventional.

Other times I try to be a good guy and I paint things a little prettier.

What kind of work you do and why?

I paint many portraits lately, but they are invented characters and I improvise a lot. When I have some money to buy a canvas, I think more about what I'm going to paint, I draw sketches. I can not afford to waste a canvas and money... yes, it's a bit painful. Anyway, this does not improve the result, unfortunately. So I try to paint as long as possible during the day, which is why I have many more works on paper.

You know, if I had to wait for the inspiration to come ... I could not consider myself a painter.

I am learning many things about color, so my main job is to learn! I can not tell you much more about it.

I use oil to paint on the canvas, and when I paint on paper, I use gouache almost always. Sometimes, acrylic, but I do not like this type of material too much.

And well, with respect to the themes that I paint, I already told you in the previous question. For now I have not been able to focus on painting thematic series and that kind of things that people like to exhibit ... I only got to paint a series of paintings on paper with dark backgrounds that I called Dark Series. For the rest, mine is not more than shooting without aiming.

Tell us more about your thought process.

Until recently, I tried to paint images and memories of my childhood and youth, but for better or for worse, I have less and less memory. I thought I could capture a kind of autobiography in my work, but it is not always possible.

Most of my life I have lived in the north, and that marks you. Now everything has changed, but in my memories the sky was gray and there were small iron particles floating in it that came from the factories. Now I even live in a much sunnier part of the country, but when I paint, my mind flies like those metallic particles and again I am a child drawing in a notebook.

I really do not know if I am answering your questions correctly!

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

You can imagine the amount of interesting artists that never cease to amaze me. Now I mention Ron Throop, a passionate artista and enthusiastic colourist, an activist of the Stuckism movement with whom I identify myself. Great remarkable guy without a doubt: https://www.ronthroop.com

Nor can I fail to mention José Luis Micó, an intimate artist of refined style, full of feeling and great honesty who tries to break through in this strange world of art: https://dibujoslu.blogspot.com

What sometimes happens to us is that we do not know where to go, or when, to have a little recognition at least as artisans. 

Portraits by Clare Trevens.

Portraits by Clare Trevens.
An Interview with Clare Trevens.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Clare Trevens and I am a French artist who lives in Southern France (Provence).

What brought you to Art?

I discovered painting thanks to my grandmother who was a painter as well and who gave me my first paintbrush (in this way initiating the interest I developed afterwards in painting).

What is your driving force?

At this stage the driving force is no longer definable. My interest is to push further into the experiment and the unknown. It's like a will to find whatever you haven't found yet, a personal quest for something you know is there but still invisible at the moment.

What kind of work you do and why?

I paint people, portraits, faces. I can't resume myself to represent something else because I'm inexplicably drawn to it. A human being is complex enough in themselves to offer a wide range of emotions, contradictions and subtlety. I sometimes enjoy looking at a landscape painting or a still life, but I wouldn't paint this kind of subject. Human is enough for me.

Tell us more about your thought process.

I start with a vague idea of what I'd like to do, a creative concept I'd like to explore (like painting human puppets for instance). Then I work around this idea. The models are not really important, they are just an excuse to represent emotions. That's why I consider all of the portraits I make as self-portraits. They may not represent me but I know I transfused a bit of myself in them. Painting as a cathartic process is not a novelty.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

My favourite artists of the moment are Otero Carbonell and Henrik Uldalen, two major figurative painters. Their skills are no longer to be demonstrated anymore.

Expressionistic Portraits by William Stoehr.

Expressionistic Portraits by William Stoehr.
Misuzu 3 80x60 in.
An Interview with William Stoehr.

Who and where are you from?

William Stoehr from Boulder, Colorado, USA.

What brought you to Art?

In 1964 I was 16 years old and I wanted to be an artist. Willem de Kooning was my art hero but, the Vietnam War was raging, I couldn’t afford art school and I probably just didn’t know what I wanted to do. I became an engineer and ultimately president of National Geographic’s world-wide mapping businesses. 40 years later in 2004, I retired to become a full-time artist. I could afford to define success in my own way. It took a few years to find my voice – that which differentiates my work and specifies a moral foundation and vision.

What is your driving force?

For me, the essence of art is the exploration of fundamental issues of our time. I explore intolerance, discrimination, addiction and violence with its victims, witnesses and survivors. I believe that my job as an artist is to get you to think and to ask questions.

What kind of work you do and why?

I do large portraits – up to seven feet in height. They could be called expressionistic. Each portrait starts with an ambiguous expression, shared gaze and uncertain context calculated to provoke you into creating the narrative.

Tell us more about your thought process.

I begin with a live model and then work from reference photographs. I suggest certain features and realistically detail others. I use a limited pallet of acrylic paint along with metallic and iridescent colors that produce changing patterns with changes in lighting and view angle.

Working freely, I drip, brush, pour, scrub and scape paint while applying a variety of lines, dots and other adjustments. I often paint multi-views or facial features slightly out of alignment. I frequently paint vaguely different expressions for each side of the face. I look to cause changes in visual perception and emotional response. These variations might make my images appear more real as time, half remembered memories, and prior experiences affect your perception.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I am a big fan of Marlene Dumas. I like the expressive nature of her work. I like her method of letting the flows and drips guide her to a final image. She frequently employs a shared gaze. She pushes boundaries as she deals with subjects that some would consider controversial or unpleasant. Her art is in-your-face and gutsy.

Abstract Figurative's by Teresa Austin.

Abstract Figurative's by Teresa Austin.
An Interview with Teresa Austin.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Teresa Austin. I am from Ocean Beach, California.

What brought you to Art?

I remember being mesmerized by the stained glass art of the Saints as I grew up. Every day at Mass, I would stare at the artwork and drop into another world. I never forgot about that. I started my own art journey in  March of 2017 at the age of 54.

What is your driving force?

To simply create. Every day. That is my driving force.

What kind of work you do and why?

I love layering with gesso and acrylics. Over and over and over again.
I prefer the raw and unfinished aesthetic, as I believe that this is the playland of the Soul. 

Tell us more about your thought process.

I have no expectations when I create. This is pure exploration. It is creating something that comes from something bigger than myself.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I love Camille Claudel. I have been enchanted with her sculptures and her story as Rodin's inspiration to since I was a child. She was drawn to the intricacies of love and madness which I tend to find myself leaning towards in my art as well. 

Figuratives by Raúl Lara Naranjo from Spain.

Figuratives by Raúl Lara Naranjo from Spain.
An Interview with Raúl Lara Naranjo.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Raúl Lara Naranjo and from Spain.

What brought you to Art?

I believe art is in all of us, all children's in school draw and color, some of them stop doing it and others keep, I never stopped and that brought me into art slowly but surely.

What is your driving force?

My driving force is art itself and the possibility it gives me to express different thoughts and ideas through the canvas.

What kind of work you do and why?

I work  figurative and abstract paints, I need and use them both in different ways and to me they complement each other and join through the "body" of the canvas, the characteristic texture that I have developed.

Tell us more about your thought process.

As I said before I work figurative and abstract and I approach them in opposite ways. In my figurative work human being is the only thing it matters to me, in my recent works I try to represent what we are and others see but also the  side of ourselves that only we know, that idea can be extrapolated to the actual global society with all the social media and again what we really are and what we show through media and the contraposition between our "on and off line" lives. My abstract is inspired most of the times in nature, I just focus on colors and textures, I kind of feel more free  keeping apart all the philosophical side and just trying to focus on the aesthetic side of art.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I would say Miquel Barceló, I really love the colors he use and the textures almost all of his paints have, something (the texture) which is key in my work.

Figurative Paintings by Madeline Berger from France.

Figurative Paintings by Madeline Berger from France.
An Interview with Madeline Berger.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Madeline Berger, I come from France and live in Finistère in Brittany.

What brought you to Art?

Since very little I draw and I paint. I was not a brilliant student at school but my teachers discovered my artistic donor and they encouraged me a lot to continue. I continued my studies by integrating a school of graphic arts in Paris. Today I am artistic director in a communication agency. All my free time is used to paint without constraints and to express myself personally.

What is your driving force?

My driving force is to represent emotions often melancholy. For some years I strive to paint every day, to progress faster. I experiment new things non stop to open my creative horizon. I'm not very good with words and that's the only way I've found to express myself.

What kind of work you do and why?

My painting is often figurative but I try to enrich it with accidents. The technique of watercolor allows me precision but also a kind of abstraction thanks to the fluidity of this medium. I have a hard time translating my approach knowing that it evolves very quickly, I am looking for a lot and I am always looking for new horizons.

Tell us more about your thought process.

I love photography so I select pictures of portraits that touch me and I paint according to them. I try to appreciate the model and the change through different color schemes or materials.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

This is not an easy question, the real favorite of recent months is Paul Cristina. He is a crazy talent, his works are unique, very original and sensitive. It's really an artist to discover.

Figurative Paintings by Judith Peck.

Figurative Paintings by Judith Peck.
An Interview with Judith Peck.

Who and where are you from?

I was born in the US in Brooklyn NY, grew up in New Jersey and have spent my whole adult life in and around Washington DC.  I consider myself an allegorical figurative artist.

What brought you to Art?

I have always been an artist.

What is your driving force?

I feel I have something to say and I feel that art gives me that voice.


What kind of work you do and why?

I am a painter-I think I have an affinity for paint and deep empathy for humanity.

Tell us more about your thought process.

I work all different ways, from jumping into a painting just knowing how a small piece of the work will be and then figuring out where it’s going- to seeing it all finished in my head and carrying it forward.  I love the creative process, burying or erasing parts of a painting, building other parts up and discovering magic.  I enjoy the struggle of creation.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I am in awe of Odd Nerdrum.  He paints more than an exterior shell of a person.  I feel he is always looking for the discovery, a true genius. I admire the obsession and passion he shows you when you see his work in person.

Portraits by Alexandra Dillon.

Portrait Paintings on unlikely objects by Alexandra Dillon from Los Angeles, California.
Artist Statement
If a picture is worth a thousand words, then a portrait is worth a thousand stories. My characters come to me the way a novelist's characters do: they form themselves through the creative process and tell me who they are. I strive to make each face unique and convey the life that that person has lived, solely through their look and expression.

In my current work, I paint on worn paintbrushes, many which have been donated by other artists. The faces are inspired by Roman mummy portraits, Old Master paintings, and any other source that speaks to me. Each face is unique and not a copy. These fun little paintings have the charm of hand mirrors, reflecting back our deepest selves.

Painting soft faces on the hard tools, like axes and cleavers, underscores our humanity. The intended purpose of each tool, juxtaposed with the portrait, alludes to inner motivations and social roles. The "old souls" on shovels, remind us of mortality and resurrection. Each of my personae has a set of dreams, disappointments, psychology and baggage. In other words, they are us.

An Interview with Alexandra Dillon.


Who and where are you from? 

I am Alexandra Dillon and I was born in Los Angeles, California.

What brought you to Art?

I started making art as a little girl and I never stopped!

How did you come up with the idea to do portraits on paintbrushes?

When a fire consumed the studio of a fellow artist, other artists were invited to make art from the burned remnants for a show. I took the burned paintbrushes. As soon as I painted a portrait on one brush, I knew I had created something special.

Where do you find your objects to paint on?

I comb through flea markets for old tools and other objects. The dresses come from the local thrift stores. Most of the paint brushes have either come from my own studio or have been donated by other artists.

How do come up with the portraits you create on paintbrushes?

I am a classically trained artist, and I can do actual portraits, but I prefer to let my imagination take the lead. My imagined portraits probably resemble people who have lived, now or sometime in the past. My characters come to me the way a novelist's do: they show up and tell me who they are. I don't begin with a fixed idea. As I work on each face, a personality emerges, and I try to imagine what kind of life they lead. They are all strong people who have resolve. I have always been interested in painting the human drama and I strive to make faces that convey a sense of the intelligence, desires and personality of that person. When the piece is done, they tell me their name.

What is your driving force? 

I  just have a need to create everyday.  Otherwise I would be bored.

What techniques do you use to make the art? 

I work in both oils and acrylics, sometimes both depending on my mood.

You call your style “psychological realism” What does that mean?

The psychology I refer to is both the psychology of the viewer and that of the characters I create. The intense gaze of the paintbrush portraits is engaging, and their shape is reminiscent of a hand-mirror. In that way, they become a reflection on self-hood. The tools, as I said are about hidden emotions.

What do you hope your audience will take away from your work?

I hope that people find my work to be provocative, amusing, beautiful and life-affirming. I like taking something that has already had one life and giving it a new one. All the rust, old paint, and other signs of its use, are like the scars we all bear, both psychologically and physically. They show a life that has been well-lived.

Tell us more about your thought process. 

I don't start with a fixed idea, I just start painting and the characters come to me.

What art inspires you?

I love art from all ages, especially the Roman-Egyptian mummy paintings, Baroque portraits, Renaissance and 19th century works. Aside from just loving the style of those paintings, old portraits show us that human beings are essentially the same as they have been for centuries. I like that continuity. And I adore very ancient art. One of my most cherished memories was visiting the cave paintings in Southern France. I am also inspired by outsider and folk art, which comes from such a pure place in the human soul.

Your work on axes, cleavers, locks, and other tools is beguiling. Can you tell us more about that?

AD: I think the juxtaposition of the face on the metal tools points to the unseen motivations of those personalities. Sometimes a pretty face is really hiding a sharp and aggressive emotion, or an eye reveals the feeling of being locked in relationship. It’s the combination of the tool’s intended purpose, plus the portrait that creates the meaning. I'm continuing to explore this area of my work.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why? 

There are so many incredible artists!!! I hate to choose. I like the paintings of  Ryan Mosley They are full of character.

Agnieszka Nienartowicz from Poland.

Portrait Paintings by Agnieszka Nienartowicz from Poland.
Adoration
An Interview with Agnieszka Nienartowicz.

Who and where are you from?

I am Agnieszka Nienartowicz and I'm from Poland.

What brought you to Art?

I have always had the need to speak. Painting turned out to be the best mean of expression for me. I am always amazed how many emotions, thoughts and feelings a painting can hide in itself and how strong can it speak to our soul, spirit and heart.  

What is your driving force?

I just have a need of painting. 

What kind of work you do and why?

My main interest is the human. All human beings, possessing physical and spiritual characteristics, are the living entities, in contrast to places and things, which are lifeless. This vibrating life, soul and spirit hidden in a flesh, pulls me in and makes a reason to penetrate their existence and nature. There is a duality in the human beings, that stretches between body and soul, physicality and psyche, life and death. I try to catch the self-mystery and intimacy in simple situations, gestures and glances, which all causes and specify us as the human beings. Often, I use attributes: objects, sceneries, paintings from the past centuries, which appear for me strange and peculiar in compelling and captivating way. I attempt to go deeply into the mind, to explore human's consciousness and what is happening internally. Intrigued by the moment of boundary between the real life and the painting, in realism I find the way to look at the world in detail and to exploration of perfectionism, clashing with myself and to contemplate in silence, detail after the detai, the complex painting tissue. 

Tell us more about your thought process.

My paintings are a result of my thoughts and reflections. I wonder how to translate a thought into an image. Then, I make drawings and invite a model to my studio to make a photosession. After this, I make projects - at this stage everything changes and very often it turns out, that my final project is completely different than primary one. And I start painting.

Rogowoi Artem a Painter from Ukraine.

An Interview with Rogowoi Artem.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Rogowoi Artem I’m painter from Kharkov region in Ukraine.

What brought you to Art?

Honestly I don’t remember why started to practice art, because it was many years ago and in different periods cause was be different. The first step was be art school, then art college and the finish my learners way was be Kharkov Academy Design and Arts where I was learn restoration of painting. It was important for my life, because I learned painting technology and something technical like fresco and others.So, it’s my metier and I love what I do. 

What is your driving force?

I try to do something what not enough in this world for me. 

What kind of work you do and why?

I mixer few styles of painting and try to create the most beautiful artistic images based on the experience of previous generations of artists and my observations of natural textures and elements. But it’s hard for me, I mean to talk about my paintings because I’m constantly dissatisfied with the results and I want to improve.

Figurative Blue Paintings by Zrinka Budimlija.

Figurative Blue Paintings by Zrinka Budimlija.
An Interview with Zrinka Budimlija.

Who and where are you from?


My Name is Zrinka Budimlija and I am originally from Zagreb, Croatia but I live in Cologne, Germany. I paint, but I am also an author and sped much of my time writing.

What brought you to Art?


I have always been creative. Even as a kid, I would rather draw or write poems than anything else. As a teenager I went to an art school and afterwards I studied art in Zagreb and Cologne. I can spend hours painting or writing. It is the best way to spend my time apart from being with my family. 

What is your driving force?


Love of beauty and knowledge, that is something I would call my driving force. It is important to me to understand people, and to find beauty in the way we interact, even if it does not always seem beautiful. There is a poetry to life, and I am keen to find it and try to capture it in my work.

What kind of work you do and why?


The paintings that I now paint are predominantly blue. I choose a limited palette of blues, whites and blacks. The inspiration for the paintings comes from old photos, either from my family, or photos that I find on flea markets. In my work I use abstract elements along with realism. This way I can split the moment shown on the photo from the space around it which allows me to try to evoke an imagined inner impression of the past moment.



Tell us more about your thought process.

The way I think about the paintings and the photographs that preceded them is non verbal. I try to let my feelings steer me in the way I choose the motifs and the way I paint them. This is an excellent way to meditate and escape the tyranny of verbal and logical thinking, that is so highly valued in the western society. When I think with my feelings, I get this visceral response to what I am painting, and that shows me the direction I am supposed to go to. 

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?


I find the work of Pascal Fendrich very intriguing. In his work he searches to find the gaps between perception and reality. 

Faces by Mayro Toyo.

Mix Media Art by Mayro Toyo.
An Interview with Mayro Toyo.

Who and where are you from?

I'm Mayro Toyo, Venezuelan based in Argentina. I have a graphic design background and I draw since I was a child with attention deficit disorder, about 6 years old. Always been attracted to colors and cartoons. My environment wasn't favorable because I grew up in a industrial/oil country and people wasn't too connected with the art but I kept the faith and the thirst to learn from the greatest artists.

What brought you to Art?

Im not sure what is is I would call it natural force, I've always thought that I was born for this.

What is your driving force?

Love, when people get connected with my work there's an interchange of positive vibes, love and gratefulness. Some people think that peace is the goal and they go do war instead of doing  art, I can't get that.

What kind of work you do and why?

I mix painting and drawing because both are my strengths. I work with acrylics because of the immediacy and the oils because of the texture (I try not to mix them in the same canvas). I like pastels because I can draw freely and I like the trace I can get.

Tell us more about your thought process.

I like the interesting faces, the human expressions, the subtle gestures, face and body, my exploration goes through the human fragility, the sensible point where I can intervene it like unexpected with colors, abstract shapes. In some way I like handle with the oposites things and make them coexist in the same canvas.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Cesar Biojo, because in some way he mixes oposites figurative and abstract.

Figurative Paintings by Victoria Selbach.

Figurative Paintings by Victoria Selbach.
An Interview with Victoria Selbach.

​Who and where are you from?

Victoria Selbach, born in Pittsburgh PA, moved to NYC after high school and have lived in NY ever since.

How you got into this? 

I have always loved seeing and building images.


What is your driving force? 

The light and my connection to women.


What kind of work you do and why? 

I am primarily creating powerful images of women. This journey allows me to explore the diversity and makeup of who we are, uncover how we see ourselves, confront how we are seen and excavate the legacy of what we carry and then pass on to the next generation.

Figurative Paintings by Ráth Márton.

Figurative Paintings by Ráth Márton.
An Interview with Ráth Márton.


Who and where are you from?

My father and grandfather were artists too, in this case I herited some talent from them.


How you got into this?

I love art so much, that the good music, everyday happenings in my life inspires me. My goal is to know my art in  world wide.

What is your driving force?

Oil paints, aquavarell also pen is my favourite tools. This is how I can show my thoughts myself in my artworks. The colours is really important to me, like every artists I like to use them, to make every work unique.

What kind of work you do and why?

Once I addicted to oil paintings, other time I like aquarell. It depends what I draw and paint, much like pure nude works and erotic pictures.

Tell us more about your thought process.

When I paint or work on my latest arts, I can let my thoughts fly, I can thinking clearly.  For istance, love everyday happenings, or new ideas, I like listening to music while I doing my work.


Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Serge Marshennikov is my inspired artists because I love his erotic pure nude works, I love his ideas of women bodies and the lambrequin harmony.

Figurative Paintings by Jerney Marisha.

Figurative Paintings by Jerney.
An Interview with Jerney Marisha.

Who and where are you from?

I was born in the Netherlands 38 years ago, but I live in Antwerp at the moment. I'm a bit of an idealist but I try not to be too dogmatic about it. I work in mental health care, which I love, but on mondays I'm not doing anything but making art. 

What brought you to Art?

I always had a creative spark inside of me. Whenever my mother was painting or creating sculptures in ceramics I would join her. There have been some periods of creative outbursts from time to time, but sooner or later I would always find myself distracted. About a year ago I realised how much I missed creating. I decided then and there that I would make time for it at least one day a week and now I'm really starting to find my way as I'm tumbling down the rabbit hole. 

What is your driving force?

It makes me happy.

What kind of work you do and why?

I'm still exploring and experimenting, but I do have a preference for limited palettes and this summer I fell in love with painting on wood. The wood helps me to work intuitively and I like to incorporate the little imperfections of the wood into the story now and then.

Tell us more about your thought process.

Honestly, the less I think about it, the better. Usually I like to work my way out of a dark background. Often I try to find my story in the wood grain and just take it from there. I'm drawn to symbolism, story art and wistful women. 

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find interesting and why?

There are so many! But I really like Victor Otero Carbonell. I love his use of colour and his work reminds me of Schiele. I have a soft spot for artists who aren't afraid of self portraits.

Surreal Paintings by Boris Indrikov.

Surreal Paintings by Boris Indrikov.
THE PREMONITION 
An Interview with Boris Indrikov.

Who and where are you from?

I’m a surrealist artist from Russia. My mother gave drawing lessons while working at school, so I was familiar with art since my childhood. Then I decided to become an engineer and then I studied at the National University of Science and Technology (MISiS). In 1990, I left the university and decided to become an artist. This idea had been slowly crystallizing while I studied. And one day I asked myself: “what do you want, man”? And the answer was to become an artist. And now I’m doing something I’ve always wanted to.

How you got into this?

I attended the courses at the different art studios taught by professional artists. But my principal teachers are the masters of the European Renaissance of XIV-XVII centuries.

What is your driving force?

I guess this is constant asking myself about who I am. In my opinion, an artist is a creator of parallel universes and going through them is a kind of ritual. For me working with a painting is like a meditation. A language of art is the language in which we talk to God.

What kind of work you do and why?

Taking about the format of my works, I prefer large canvases. Further I'm going to do some sculptures and some kind of fabric design.

Tell us more about your thought process.

Can you remember Michelangelo’s words? «Every block of stone has a statue inside it and it is the task of the sculptor to discover it».My method of making a painting is a bit similar with the only distinction: the extraction of the image takes its place from the texture that I create on a canvas.


Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting?

Alexander Sigov, Vladislav Erko, Olga Dugina and Andrej Dugin.

Portrait Paintings by Nena Stojanovic.

Portrait Paintings by Nena Stojanovic.
An Interview with Nena Stojanovic.

Who and where are you from?

I’m Nena Stojanovic and I was born on September 28th, 1973 in Ivanjica. Just prior to the year 2000, I left my homeland Serbia to move to Nafplio, the first capital of Greece, where I still live today, happily married and a mother of two beautiful children.

What brought you to Art?

As the daughter of an engineer, painter and wood craftsman and designer, I grew up being amazed by the art created around me. The arts existed in the lives of many in my family circles, always feeding and influencing my growth and development as an artist. When at school, this was evident as my curiosity urged me to be the best in my classes. I was always involved in the arts and my artwork was always featured in displays. In 1987, when I was a sixth grade student, my project was selected in the contest "Best children's drawings of Yugoslavia" to be printed in the book "Poems for grandfather” by famous Serbian poet, Milovan Vitezovic. Outside art, I excelled in gymnastics where I collected 10 medals, a broken tooth, and what became an interest in dentistry. I graduated from the Medical School of Belgrade earning a degree as a dental technician.

What is your driving force?

Undoubtedly, my feelings and only my feelings … Very ordinary conversations, the joy of my family members, meetings with dear people, exchange of experiences, presence in innocence and intact nature, exploration of new destinations ... these are the things that make me happy and which are the main drivers of my feelings and therefore the inspiration that leads me towards painting.

What kind of work do you do and why?

All artists evolve through their work seeking a way in which they will recognize themselves. I am the type of person who is not always satisfied with the same results. After years of researching myself in my work, I feel I definitely belong to abstract art, as well as to painting portraits in some specific way, covered with elements of abstraction. Although technically, my abstract works are the best, my portraits are more effective. The point of my portraits is not perfection painting but the subject's characteristic eye expressiveness through which I try to convey all mental tensions and transitions to the psyche of each observer. This is all about my own continued personal exploration and research.

Tell us more about your thought process.

The process of creating my works, as I already mentioned, depends on the current mood and my feelings. For me there is no planning. My approach to any kind of work is always instinctive and intuitive. This includes material selection, selection of color combinations as well as the technical approach. I would like to point out that I am among the rare painters who use enamel paint. Surely this is a difficult way to reach the desired effect. This is my personal challenge and a way to create a unique and different result.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

This is definitely the hardest question for me. I generally do not use the word favorite. I would usually say one of my favorites but when it comes to painters, I cannot even say that. There are so many talented artists whose creations I adore and whom I admire and so many branches of painting it is impossible to choose only one artist. Although I haven’t been overly active lately, you can check out the list of artists I love and follow on my Saatchi Art portfolio. Thank you.