Contemporary Surrealism by Amy Guidry from Louisiana.

Contemporary Surrealism by Amy Guidry from Louisiana.
Invasive-Species - 20in x 10in
An Interview with Amy Guidry.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Amy Guidry and I currently reside in Lafayette, Louisiana.

What brought you to Art?

I've been creating since I was a very young child.  I come from a family of artists, including my mother and brother, so I was exposed to art at an early age.  I would create countless drawings all day, every day.  On occasion I got to use messier media such as paint or oil pastels.  It was something that came naturally and brought me immense enjoyment.

What is your driving force?

The welfare of all of nature is my driving force.  Since childhood, I've been fascinated by nature and was always outside playing with my dog and looking for animals in the forest nearby.  I was aware of animal extinction and felt that if I created beautiful artwork of animals then maybe people would care about them as much as I did.  My approach is basically the same today.  Create art that moves people and makes them care about animals and the natural world.  With climate change and its myriad of consequences, I feel that it's more important than ever to inspire others to action.  It's a lot to ask of a painting, but I feel that art can provide a visual for a concept that may be hard to imagine otherwise.  Even my works that are basically animal portraits serve as a reminder of what we have to lose.  

What kind of work you do and why?

My paintings are mostly acrylic on canvas, with a few exceptions done on paper.  I refer to my work as Contemporary Surrealism.  Themes I explore involve our relationship with other animals and nature, as well as the cycle of life and connections between all life forms.  I work in series, each painting has its own message, with the overall concept conveying respect for all of nature and humanity.  Surrealism allows me to delve into environmental issues and animal welfare issues, creating strange worlds that reflect the current state of our planet.  What seems illogical can come to life through a painting.  Though in many ways, I feel like what I paint is a mirror-image of our reality.  

Tell us more about your thought process.

The premise of my current series “In Our Veins” is to explore the connections between all life forms and the cycle of life. Through a psychological, and sometimes visceral, approach, this series investigates our relationship to the natural world, as well as our role in the life cycle. Concepts such as life and death, survival and exploitation, and the interdependence of living and nonliving organisms are illustrated throughout. "In Our Veins" demonstrates these ideas in a surreal, psychologically-charged narrative in an effort to raise awareness and promote ecological conservation.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I've always been a huge fan of Lucien Freud, especially his later work.  I saw his "Naked Man, Back View" in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and got as close as possible to view it.  What's fascinating for me is the texture and how it has a life of its own.  His work may be a figure painting when standing further away, but up close it is a frenzied mix of colors, textures, and brushstrokes.  It's the complete opposite of how I work and I'm in awe of how loose yet controlled it is. 

Dark Surrealism Paintings by Paul Yunin.

Dark Surrealism Paintings by Paul Yunin.
Soulmates 87x61cm (34x24in) Oil, hardboard.
An Interview with Paul Yunin.

Who and where are you from? 

Paul Yunin, a painter from Russia, working in St. Petersburg. 

What brought you to Art? 

By education I am an engineer. I was brought to art by the love for the muse about 5-6 years ago. But I was completely immersed in painting only in 2016. The creative half won engineering in me. I originally started working in interior painting, painted on demand, but then realized that I was closer to being an artist rather than a craftsman. 

What is your driving force? 

I have a desire to talk to the audience, I have something to say. Also, I have a need for experiment and a search for new ways of expressing an idea. Starting my work, I do not know what I will end up with. I direct the brush that gives birth to images on the canvas which my subconscious suggests to me. The inspiration for the plots is my relationships with people, nature, maybe even with God and also with other forms of art.

I prefer Renaissance artists: Leonardo Da Vinci, Sandro Botticelli, etc. When painting my work, I mostly use the scumble technique of painting. It unites me with Renaissance artists, with symbolism and some mysticism of their artworks. It is worth noting such kings of dark art as Zidzislav Beckinsky and Hans Rudy Giger. If we talk about cinema, the works of Trier, Kubrick, Tarkovsky and other directors, similar in spirit are close to me.

What kind of work you do and why? 

I paint in the genre of dark surrealism. But I'm not trying to stay within the frames of the genre. Rather, on the contrary, I am trying to avoid stamps that have developed in different kinds of dark styles of world art. I don’t have a goal to depict a horror story, cause anxiety in the viewer.

Tell us more about your thought process. 

At the beginning of my work, I'm tuning in to the wave of maximum openness of soul and sincerity. I trying to paint my surreal artworks truly, as Friedrich Nietzsche had said "writing with own blood". My task is to convey the light and darkness of my own experiences, feelings, thoughts as accurately as possible with the help of non-verbal images, and if I may say so - of the archetypes. I don’t write extramundane worlds. I paint what is here and now, trying to pack the prose of reality into a bright poetic form. Behind the gloomy atmosphere of my works there are hidden the revelations of the subconscious, deep, perhaps vulnerable sensuality, religious mysticism and even lyricism. Behind thorn spikes, suffering of heroes and unearthly matters there is spiritual nakedness, liberation from the burdensome conventions of the surrounding world and striving for truth, at all cost, whether it is pleasant or cruel.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Alexander Kostetsky (Russ. Александр Владимирович Костецкий, Ukr.Олександр Володимирович Костецький;, November 14, 1954 in Kiev – January 4, 2010 in Kiev) was a Ukrainian painter and sculptor. His name has various transliterations into English and variants include Aleksandr Kostetsky, Alexander Kostecky, Alexander Kostetski and Aleksandr Kosteckij. His artist stile is Magic Realism.

Surreal Paintings by Boris Indrikov.

Surreal Paintings by Boris Indrikov.
THE PREMONITION 
An Interview with Boris Indrikov.

Who and where are you from?

I’m a surrealist artist from Russia. My mother gave drawing lessons while working at school, so I was familiar with art since my childhood. Then I decided to become an engineer and then I studied at the National University of Science and Technology (MISiS). In 1990, I left the university and decided to become an artist. This idea had been slowly crystallizing while I studied. And one day I asked myself: “what do you want, man”? And the answer was to become an artist. And now I’m doing something I’ve always wanted to.

How you got into this?

I attended the courses at the different art studios taught by professional artists. But my principal teachers are the masters of the European Renaissance of XIV-XVII centuries.

What is your driving force?

I guess this is constant asking myself about who I am. In my opinion, an artist is a creator of parallel universes and going through them is a kind of ritual. For me working with a painting is like a meditation. A language of art is the language in which we talk to God.

What kind of work you do and why?

Taking about the format of my works, I prefer large canvases. Further I'm going to do some sculptures and some kind of fabric design.

Tell us more about your thought process.

Can you remember Michelangelo’s words? «Every block of stone has a statue inside it and it is the task of the sculptor to discover it».My method of making a painting is a bit similar with the only distinction: the extraction of the image takes its place from the texture that I create on a canvas.


Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting?

Alexander Sigov, Vladislav Erko, Olga Dugina and Andrej Dugin.

Surrealist Paintings by Spiros Gelekas from Greece.

Surrealist Paintings by Spiros Gelekas from Greece.
SUNSET FROM ANOTHER WORLD.
An Interview with Spiros Gelekas.

Who and where are you from?

I am called Spiros Gelekas and I am a self-taught painter-artist. I was born and raised in Corfu, Greece where I live until today.


How you got into this?

My development as an artist began in my early childhood. My first stimuli were the comics and especially “The Thundercats” and Marvel’s heroes. I started by copying the drawings of the stories I read and I continued with composing and illustrating my own narrations using the same heroes. My first essential contact with the art of painting occurs in 1998. I will experiment mainly with classical themes, representation-copying the reality, landscape composition using classical technique. As time passes by, my human evolution will be determined by the 90’s books, fantastic literature, with typical examples of the Lord of the Rings and Silmarillion, Science Fiction movies such as Star Wars, Lord of the rings, and rock music, mainly Rock Opera and Progressive Rock. All these together, compose my artistic amalgam which makes me able to produce my purely personal art. Writers who contributed decisively to my way of thinking and expressing myself are Alan Poe, Tom Robbins, Carlos Castaneda, Umberto Eco and John Ronald Reuel Tolkien in the place of the most important.


What is your driving force?

Except from my personal human completion, through my art – my personal way to express my thoughts to the world - I aim at offering an aesthetic satisfaction, daydreaming, opening 
mind and parallel our physical and mental eyes. I aim at the creation of a world that will extend beyond our own one, which is visual and conceptual finite. The driving force in my art is my personal journey for the creation of a new fantasy world. It’s like composing an other type of "fairy tale". A “fairy tale” that is not something fake but a different aspect of our physical-material world. A fantasy world from my point of view.


What kind of work you do and why?

I study and embrace the artistic movements of surrealism and realism, fully aware of the fact that the former feeds of the soul of the latter and vice versa. Through my art, I seek their union, aiming to a comprehensive "explosion" of emotional and mental pleasure


Tell us more about your thought process.

Anxiety, joy and ecstasy are the three words which describe what I feel every time I see an empty canvas. A ritual followed gently by preparing the canvas, the colors, the brushes. The smell from the fresh box-canvas is a real pleasure. I usually start directly with a brush or knife, depending on the technique. Rarely I make a draft. I have studied in my mind every movement, each line, each color. Sometimes I cannot make it  so easy and I get anxious until I have the result in every detail, as I have imagined. But in the end, the result justifies me. A creation happened again, I m thinking timidly in the back of my mind. Another step towards to immortality. But I do not speak for it with people. To be honest, sometimes I want to go back to the time of the process, to do it again. I cannot describe the enjoyment of every moment that passes and gone. I feel nostalgic every time a project ends and maybe a bitter joy. I seperate a piece of myself, which is ready to travel out to the world.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Principal inspiration - Artists are Salvador Dali and Roger Dean. Salvador Dali gives realism within the sphere of surrealism and Roger Dean uses a supreme technique for the creation of a world which is similar to mine.

Pop Surrealist Paintings by Valentina Toma.

Pop Surrealist Paintings by Valentina Toma.
Felix and the spider - watercolor on wood 35 x 50 cm.
An Interview with Valentina Toma.


Who and where are you from?

I'm Valentina Toma' I was born in north part of Italy but i been lived in many european country , last 10 years between Finland , Malta and Spain where I live right now.

How you got into this?

My father is a painter too so my first toyss is been brush and colors, then i never stop to paint . I also study art, i'm graduate at Accademy of fine art of Firenze.

What is your driving force?

My driving force is fantasy , even do I can be good classic painter my goal time after time is be unconventional even is figuratively, Paint is my black hole where time no matter day pass in a hour and i can fell good.

What kind of work you do and why?

My work can be positioneted in a pop surrealist scene , classic pictorial process coupled with unusual pairs and unlikely events, why I said I like to think that people may be surprised and a the same time be able to see something aggravating.


Tell us more about your thought process.

Some time my process can be long and come from my fantasy some time i dream about , can happen all of a sudden in day the immagine come on my mind is like a can see already and then i follow to build the image already clear for me , no easy dreams come true i try to do in my work.


Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

There is more than one artist I like the work , but my favorite is Greg "Craola" Simkins cos he is amazing with acrylic color in a way I can't be and is full of fantasy and color and invention. 

Surrealist Paintings by Steven Kenny.

Surrealist Paintings by Steven Kenny.
The Ribbons, 2015, oil on canvas, 40 x 28 inches.
An Interview with Steven Kenny.

Who and where are you from? 

My name is Steven Kenny. I grew up in a town called Peekskill which is in the beautiful Hudson Valley of New York, about 50 miles north of New York City.


How you got into this? 

In third grade I won first place in a Safety Poster Contest in my age group. That early artistic recognition and praise is very likely the event that set me on the path to becoming an artist.


What is your driving force? 

I think one of the main motivations for most artists is to be heard, seen, understood, appreciated, and loved. Since childhood, art has been the most effective way of attracting attention and expressing my thoughts and feelings. By creating objects of beauty that intrigue viewers I can arouse their curiosity, draw them in, and express myself on multiple, non-verbal levels.


What kind of work you do and why? 

I’m a surrealist. Surrealism allows me to express myself from an intuitive, unconscious place while still painting images that walk a line between reality and dream.

Pop Surrealism by Lioba Brückner from Germany.

Pop Surrealism by Lioba Brückner from Germany.
Here in this world she changed her life. - 60x60cm.
An Interview with Lioba Brückner.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Lioba Brückner and I'm an artist from Germany. I am born in Oberhausen, a city in the middle of the multicultural Ruhr Area, where I still live and work.

How did you get into this?

I was always drawn to art and I can't remember a time where I wouldn't draw or scribble something. In school, I was the one that drove teachers crazy because I wouldn't stop drawing during classes. My first influences were Louis Royo, who's work I discovered in the local comic store and animes like Dragonball Z and Pokemon inspired me to draw in a more Manga like fashion. I discovered that I loved the blend of realism and an illustrative style. In school, I also met my life partner who I ask to teach me how to draw properly and how to paint with oil colors. Luckily, he agreed!  The following time I spent with learning and it took me about 5-6 years until I was finally happy with my artwork and I would build a website and show it online.


What is your driving force?

My driving force is more like an urge: If I don't draw or paint for a couple of days I feel restless! Also, I'm constantly inspired by the beauty around me. If I see beautiful roses, women or girls while I'm outside I already imagine how I would paint their faces and how I would mix their skin tones and which medium I would choose. Then I already experience the satisfying flow of my watercolors or the vibrant colors of my oil paints and I can't wait to start painting!


What kind of work you do and why?

My work is called pop surrealism or new contemporary art. But I didn't know that until 2 years ago! I discovered this movement on Instagram and immediately knew that I found a group of art and artists that I belong to.
I paint mostly romantic portraits of women which sometimes tend more into a fantastic direction, sometimes more to realism. And nature always plays a major part in my paintings: my compositions includes butterflies, roses, foliage or birds because they inspire me on a daily basis in my little studio garden.

I create art because, for me, it is the most enjoyable way to express myself. Some people express their selfs through fashion, through writing or through a thousand other things. For me, it is creating visions of a fantastic realm, a dream world that let you escape from the harsh reality.