Watercolor Artist Eugenia Gorbacheva from Russia.

Watercolor Artist Eugenia Gorbacheva from Russia.
An Interview with Eugenia Gorbacheva.

Who and where are you from? 

My name is Eugenia Gorbacheva and I'm watercolor artist. I live in Russia in a small and pretty city Zhukovsky.

What brought you to Art? 

My whole life was connected with art. As a child, I graduated from the fine arts school. I received a diploma in Russian State University named after AN Kosygin (Technology, Design, Art). 10 years worked as a fashion designer. But now I decided to devote myself to a completely watercolor painting.

What is your driving force? 

My driving force is my family. My little daughter inspires me every new day with her energy and vitality.

What kind of work you do and why? 

I love watercolor by its lightness, airiness, transparency. For it stubbornness, unpredictability. For the fact that he needs to tame and find a common language with it.

Tell us more about your thought process. 

I like to use bright colors in my paintings, but some landscapes require the use of more muted colors. 
When I paint, I focus on artwork as much as possible. At that moment, nothing can distract me.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Sergey Temerev This artist is just a magician when painting the sky.

Figurative Paintings by Madeline Berger from France.

Figurative Paintings by Madeline Berger from France.
An Interview with Madeline Berger.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Madeline Berger, I come from France and live in Finistère in Brittany.

What brought you to Art?

Since very little I draw and I paint. I was not a brilliant student at school but my teachers discovered my artistic donor and they encouraged me a lot to continue. I continued my studies by integrating a school of graphic arts in Paris. Today I am artistic director in a communication agency. All my free time is used to paint without constraints and to express myself personally.

What is your driving force?

My driving force is to represent emotions often melancholy. For some years I strive to paint every day, to progress faster. I experiment new things non stop to open my creative horizon. I'm not very good with words and that's the only way I've found to express myself.

What kind of work you do and why?

My painting is often figurative but I try to enrich it with accidents. The technique of watercolor allows me precision but also a kind of abstraction thanks to the fluidity of this medium. I have a hard time translating my approach knowing that it evolves very quickly, I am looking for a lot and I am always looking for new horizons.

Tell us more about your thought process.

I love photography so I select pictures of portraits that touch me and I paint according to them. I try to appreciate the model and the change through different color schemes or materials.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

This is not an easy question, the real favorite of recent months is Paul Cristina. He is a crazy talent, his works are unique, very original and sensitive. It's really an artist to discover.

Faces with Martha Zmpounou.

Faces with Martha Zmpounou.
An Interview with Martha Zmpounou.

Who and where are you from?

I am a London based, Greek visual artist and Illustrator. I have been living and working in London for the last 8 years. Besides being a practicing artist I am also a Lecturer at London College of Fashion, University of the Arts London, and a Visiting Lecturer at De Montfort University. I often find myself joggling between working as an artist and teaching drawing and illustration. I enjoy both equally and one practice feeds into the other creatively.


How you got into this?

I was into drawing, painting and anything creative for as far as I remember. I studied Fine arts and Painting at Aristotle University in Greece and Illustration at Central Saint Martins in London. Since then, I have exhibited widely my work in the UK and Greece.


What is your driving force?

What inspires me to draw and paint is whatever happens when my imagination clashes with my everyday life; It’s the cross breed of these two that urges me to create my images.

What kind of work you do and why?

My style of working changes according to the theme I have in mind; however, the common thread that connects different groups of my works is the figure. 

In my recent works, I use the idea of the portrait as a means and space of exposure, a way to communicate identity. Drawing from the fashion and pop culture or from found vintage imagery I want to create fragmented and grotesque portraits that touch upon the misinterpretation of the human figure in media. Playing with the stereotypes of the ideal beauty they balance between beauty and repulsion.

I use masking and layering techniques and a colourful mix of water based media, mostly ink and watercolour. I often start without a figure in mind;by exploringand reacting to the media’s properties I create a series of abstract ‘episodes’ on various papers that afterword’s will inspire or lead to more representational/realistic outcomes. Working in this ‘inverted’ way has always being exciting to me as I could never predict the final outcome.I would discover it gradually throughout the process of making.I enjoy experimenting a lot with media and new ideas.

In some other group of works, my work process could  involve cutting and reassembling drawings, sketches, fragments of paintings and found imagery, to create a body of visual elements that when brought together will create a new story about the depicted figure.The figure in this case is developed as a construct of fragments and spaces, an assemblage of elements disparate and connected at once.  
I am really interested in the modalities of hiding and revealing and I like to combine or juxtapose realistically depicted elements with more abstract/expressive ones in one piece of work.

Paintings by Buket Koyuncu from Turkey.

Paintings by Buket Koyuncu from Turkey.
Gredi
An Interview with Buket Koyuncu.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Buket Koyuncu. I’m from Canakkale, Turkey.  In briefly ‘’ Independence is my happiness, the world is my country and my religion is to do good’’

How you got into this?

I was always interested in painting and art. I was always trying to be better and observing. When I developed in my inner journey and learned to integrate with art, I began to gain originality. And so I began to internalize into painting and dance with it in the same rhythm.


What is your driving force?

My divine force; many things... In some moment I see the object very different from the actual form, I enjoy with this simulate and this is generally results as a creative idea... The images that I see during meditation... From the word(s) in the book that I read.. The shapes that revive in my mind while listening to a song.. While reading and searching ; People in history, interesting life’s, stories, mythology, esoterism, scientific approaches, mathematic, sacred geometry.. Love, stars, sky, nature.. In fact, everything that feeds my mind and my soul.

What kind of work you do and why?

My works were made with watercolors. But I also love using mixed media, too. Priority in painting is the free mind for me. That's why I’m interested in the souls and narratives of my drawing, not in which art movement they are involved. So usually they have a deep stories. My characters use to see their right eye with macro and left eye with micro. The rest of the definitions are specific to each one. Why?.. Because with each of them I am closering to myself more. 

I convey the positive vibrations of my art, and I hope also my drawings too convey to the people who looked them.

Watercolor Paintings by Yulia Shevchenko from United States.

Watercolor Paintings by Yulia Shevchenko from United States.
An Interview with Yulia Shevchenko.

Who and from where are you?       

My name is Yulia Shevchenko and I am Russian origin artist who lives in New Jersey, United States.

How you got into this?                   

One day I just wanted to try if I am able to paint something with watercolor and since that day I didn't put out brush from my hands.

What is your driving force?

I don't know actually, it's just huge passion that force me to paint.

What kind of work you do and why?

There are no restrictions in my objects of watercolor. I like to watercolor almost everything. The question is how success I am. From one side I draw less objects that I'm not good in, but from other side I like to make challenges for myself.

Paintings by Oyewole Olufemi Ayodeji from Nigeria.

Paintings by Oyewole Olufemi Ayodeji from Nigeria.
An Interview with Oyewole Olufemi Ayodeji.


Who and from where are you?

My name is Oyewole Olufemi Ayodeji, im a native of Osun state, Nigeria. I was born and raised in Lagos state.

How you got into this?

I believe art for me is inbuilt; it has been an essential part of my life. I’ve had a fascination with drawing since childhood, a skill I practice constantly. When it was time for me to study in the college, it wasn’t difficult for me to settle for Fine Arts.  While studying Fine and Applied Arts in the Federal College of Education (Technical), Akoka, I was fortunate to meet with lfluential individuals that guided and exposed me to the rudiment of drawing. Olusola Obayan and Hakeem Dipeolu  tirelessly helped refine my talent.  My full studio experience also contributed to my love for practice. I had my first industrial experience with Defactori Studio, a group of full-time studio artists working in the same studio. While in Defactori Studio, I trained under Akintunde John, Chika Idu, Taiwo George Taylor, Essien Joe, Anthony Ayanu, Ola Balogun, Awoyemi Ajibade, Damola Adepoju and Simeon Akhirebhu. These Artists through their practice contributed immensely to the pure academic knowledge I gained in the college. I later spent more time with Akintunde John and Chika Idu because of my love for watercolour. Akintunde John will always teach how to paint watercolour in the studio and I constantly disturb Chika Idu in his home studio………..for more knowledge and techniques on watercolour.

Before I finally graduated from the college in 2006, I met Dr Akin Onipede who told me to always “study my teacher’s teacher”, if I really want to grow deep with my passion for the Arts…..which triggered my love for the works of Abiodun Olaku.  After graduating from the college with distinction in 2006, I practiced for four years and later went back to school for my first degree. During my study at the prestigious  Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile Ife, Nigeria, I met with Dr Olusegun Ajiboye, Dr Stephen Folaranmi and Dr Babasehinde Ademuleya who also taught me while I was in the college. I majored in painting and graduated in 2012. At different times during my first degree, I also had few months of studio training under Olusegun Adejumo and Kelani Olanrewaju Abass. 

Paintings by Stan Miller from United States.

Paintings by Stan Miller from United States.
An Interview with Stan Miller.

Who and where are you from? 

My name is Stan Miller and I am from the United States, Spokane, Washington….close to Seattle.

How you got into this?  

I always enjoyed art from the time I was a child.  I took art classes in school and also in college. When I graduated from college in 1973 I started painting in watercolor as my full time occupation.  I have been painting every day since 1973.  I also teach watercolor classes around the world.


What is your driving force?  

Every person has a desire to express themselves.  We all use language, but we can also use music, dance, writing, theater or painting.  When I paint I can share my ideas about how I look at life, the way I look at a landscape, a person’s face.  Being able to visually share with people, the way I see the world is very exciting, this is what drives me.

What kind of work you do and why?  

I like to paint realistically, or representationally.  But, I also enjoy abstract art.  Behind every good realistic painting is a well designed abstract painting.  We need to care about how we arrange the shapes, the colors, textures, the values, how lighting creates mood.  These things are equally important as the subject matter.  I like traditional subjects, portraits, landscapes and still life…sometimes flowers and animals.  Everything we see, if it excites us, can be a painting.  I like common things, everyday things…I’m not interested in painting something strange or uncommon.  I’ll let the modern painters paint those subjects.

It is important that everyone use art to share their feelings.  Speaking is not enough.  Paint, sing, play an instrument, write a poem, dance, act…but use art to more fully express yourself and our world will be a happier and safer place.

Miniature Paintings by Christine Marie McLellan from USA.

Miniature Paintings by Christine Marie McLellan from USA.
From the Brush of Artist - I'm Christine Marie McLellan an experienced artist but have felt uncomfortable in the past calling myself an 'artist' but lately have been gaining more self esteem and confidence. I painted a couple miniatures about  ten years ago but have been inspired by other miniaturists on Instagram and am now pretty much a full time miniaturist. Painting tiny is a new challenge for me that I have come to love.

I have been painting a lot of pet portraits lately which I didn't plan but enjoy it very much. I love how happy people are when they see a pi tire I painted of their pet and love hearing the stories they tell me about their pets.
I am so grateful to be able to do this.
Thank you.

Paintings by Marina Ignatova from Tolyatti, Russia.

Paintings by Marina Ignatova from Tolyatti, Russia.
From the Brush of Artist - My name is Marina Ignatova. I'm from Tolyatti, Russia. I've graduated Moscow Technological Institute as fashion designer. A few years ago I realized that painting is my biggest passion. As far as I can remember myself I was painting pictures but I've started draw in watercolor only two years ago.

At the beginning it was just a small hobby. Sketches that I was drawing for myself and uploaded to Instagram. Now hobby has grown into something bigger. Today I have contracts for limited editions apparel and bed linen paintings, thematic paintings, landscapes and still lifes. I've started to give lessons to students.

I love watercolour for its specificity: blurring, conventionality, the flow of color from one to another, mixing. I draw paintings in realistic style but like to try something new and uncover paint's hidden potential. I draw in a quick manner to complete painting in one session. Starting from the silhouette and ending with small details.

I like light and simple watercolour paintings. Sometime it's better to leave unfinished work than make it overcomplicated. I like do draw everything: people, animals, flowers, sceneries. Even try to find beauty in daily routines. Maybe it's just because i haven't found my own unique style.
I draw a lot of animals. watercolor's "wet" technique can create awesome fur texture. And when you draw flowers watercolor uncovers it's true potential — bright and light transparency.

Watercolor Paintings by Emma Larsson from Stockholm, Sweden.

Watercolor Paintings by Emma Larsson from Stockholm, Sweden.
Emma Larsson is a Stockholm-based artist and sculptor whose imagery touches the boundary between colouristic dreamscapes and melancholy figures. Having previously worked with mostly oil and acrylic, Larsson has devolved into her own expressive abstract water colouring. Larsson also sculpts pottery where the characteristic figures are lifted from the paper to adopt new living forms. 

From the Brush of Artist - My childhood was when I first discovered loneliness. It became my refuge where all the stories began and I needed to fill that space with something that didn’t exist in reality. I guess my art is the extension of that “something”. Derived from loneliness. 

These works commute between then and now. I go into that other world and create dreams. Dreams of escaping, of longing, of hope… That’s my way of handling it. Through art I sustain and survive.

Quite often there are layers of different emotions in my paintings. There can be streaks of darkness and sadness but also of light and vibrancy. In my visual world I’m not very affected by things outside.

Watercolor Paintings by Elena Vlasova from Moscow, Russia.

Watercolor Paintings by Elena Vlasova from Moscow, Russia.
From the Brush of Artist - My name is Elena Vlasova, I’m from Russia, Moscow. Now I am artist and I teach painting in water-colours, make workshops and master classes,  teach at Kalacheva Art School.

I studied at Moscow State University of Pedagogicswhere I got a specialty in pedagogy and psychology, I chose a specialization of visual arts. Over the time, this was not enough for me, and I graduated from the School of Watercolor of Sergei Andriyaka. I always improve my skills by visiting master classes of famous watercolor artists.

I draw from my early childhood. Often than you get something easy –it isnot taken seriously - often we think: this is clear, do not have to pay attention for it. Therefore, it seems that we need to find something more serious as a profession. And only after time the nature takes its own, and you understand that it's like breathing - you couldn’t not to draw.

I came to study at the School of Watercolor of Sergei Andriyaka, and this has determined the choice of specialization. I dipped into environment where watercolor appears in all its beauty and power, and it was not some kind of delight, it was a great desire to achieve the same success. From this time along this road I go.

Beautiful Watercolor Paintings by Blanca Alvarez from Malaga, Spain.

Beautiful Watercolor Paintings by Blanca Alvarez from Malaga, Spain.
Camino hacia el faro.
From the Brush of Artist - Mi nombre es Blanca Álvarez, vivo en Málaga, España, una ciudad de tradición marinera, que invita al descanso y al disfrute del entorno. De gente amable y acogedora.
Tengo la suerte de aunar profesión y pasión; la pintura, en concreto la técnica de la acuarela. Siempre me ha gustado pintar, no hubo un hecho desencadenante, es algo que siempre ha estado ahí desde que tengo uso de razón. Me formé en una academia de arte. Pienso que siempre hace falta tener una base de técnica antes der poder seguir solo. Una vez conseguida esa base, lo más importante es pintar y pintar, trabajo y trabajo, para seguir mejorando. 
Desde que descubrí la acuarela hace años, no he podido abandonar esta técnica. Me encanta su transparencia y como los colores se mezclan entre sí. Es la técnica más difícil de todas, imprevisible, es  el  agua quien decide. En mi trabajo busco captar la luz y la atmósfera del momento. Cualquier tema es bueno, no quiero ponerme límites, quiero poder pintar paisajes, marinas, ciudades, retratos etc. Pero uno de mis  temas predilectos son las marinas, especialmente aquellas en las que aparecen faros en medio de un fuerte oleaje. Los faros tienen algo misterioso que atrapa al espectador.